Ford Mustang Forum banner

How do you wash your Mustang?

  • By hand - Always

    Votes: 536 66.6%
  • By hand - when I have time

    Votes: 160 19.9%
  • By hand - when I'm in the mood

    Votes: 59 7.3%
  • Automatic car wash - Always

    Votes: 50 6.2%

  • Total voters
    805
1 - 20 of 225 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,634 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Choose from Poll
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
What kills me is there is a hand wash car wash in my area....except they use those broom looking brushes to pre-scrub the car before it goes in for the hand wash. Almost defeats the purpose IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,666 Posts
Now I will be doing it always by hand, but when I didn't have a garage it was by hand - weather permitting LOL. Good 'ol North Dakota for you. The nice thing about below 0 temps is that once you get it clean, it stays clean for most of the winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
By hand mostly.

Touchless automatic car wash when I need a touch up.

Hand washing is always the best!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
386 Posts
By hand for me always. Black paint is hard to maintain and especially now that it is getting hotter. Always have to watch out for water spots, but when its clean it looks great :gringreen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,084 Posts
Hand wash. Atuo wash is a waste of money if you live in a warmer climate IMO. I do a better job and save the money. Plus, I get her looking perfect every time!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
a foam gun as step seems to work for a lot of people and for those who want to avoid the swirlies. i will try mine out next week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,852 Posts
Hand washing has the draw back of direct friction of rag to paint rubbing away/buffing away the clear coat and grounding ANY debris on the car itself (or the microfiber) INTO the paint causing micro scratches (i dont care WHAT kind of cloth you use).

Spray washing can remove some of the clear coat and or have gritty/recycled detergents which can do the same as above.

There is no right answer, they both suck but both are necessary. Pick your poison.

I wash every week, rotating between spray, auto, and hand. I get the dead bugs off the front end and side mirrors every 24 to 48 hours, i put the spray on wax on the front every week and the whole car every two weeks.

There really are no "perfect ways" to handle paint maintance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Always hand wash. That way I can make sure any bug residue or other gunk is cleaned off, as well as all the dirt. Don't want to take chances car wash could scratch surface, and they never get it totally clean.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RED06GTCONV

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Always hand wash. That way I can make sure any bug residue or other gunk is cleaned off, as well as all the dirt. Don't want to take chances car wash could scratch surface, and they never get it totally clean.
Having worked as a detailed for many years, I say NOTHING beats the hand wash. With the right supplies, some patience and a little know how - you car an stay looking great for a long time!
To expand on this topic, how about waxing? Do you do it yourself, and if so, what kind of wax do you prefer? I have recently found a new wax by TurtleWax. It is a Synthetic wax that leaves no white residue, and looks AMAZING! Defiantly recommend it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RED06GTCONV

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,962 Posts
Hand wash or touchless carwash depending of the time I have...
 
  • Like
Reactions: RED06GTCONV

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
Only mother nature and myself ever wash my cars. :yup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Hand washing has the draw back of direct friction of rag to paint rubbing away/buffing away the clear coat and grounding ANY debris on the car itself (or the microfiber) INTO the paint causing micro scratches (i dont care WHAT kind of cloth you use).
I think its the drying that is the most hazardous. While washing there is at least water and soap as a lubricant; just don't use pressure. But when drying with contact to the paint there is no lubrication on the final pass. Any spec of dirt that was missed or landed on the car after washing or was displaced by water draining from some crevice gets pushed into the paint and scratches it. That's why I was disappointed by the ~$400 Costco system and Mr. Clean in the past. My next step is to try forced air to blow all water off. Will be looking into the purpose built auto dryers, leaf blowers and/or using some special attachment for my shop air compressor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
I hand washed my cars for years, and then after taking a careful look at the results, I switched to automatic car washes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I think its the drying that is the most hazardous. While washing there is at least water and soap as a lubricant; just don't use pressure. But when drying with contact to the paint there is no lubrication on the final pass. Any spec of dirt that was missed or landed on the car after washing or was displaced by water draining from some crevice gets pushed into the paint and scratches it.
Quoted for Truth.

Scratched my baby up the other day while drying. I thought everything was perfect and meticulously clean.... After walking around and inspecting her, I noticed a scratch and the angle and depth proved that it was done on the drying using my expensive microfibre towel jiggy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
By hand always. Soap gun first, 2 bucket method, rinse, air dry with portable blower, then quick detail spray remaining spots and final dry with a microfiber towel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
Hand wash but I do like a touchless in the salt months for the undercarriage wash, that helps me to not lie awake at night imagining my chassis rusting as I sleep.

As to products, recent Griot's Garage convert thanks to an OCD friend. The spray wax is so easy to apply you almost feel guilty and the car looks stunning.

Will be looking into the purpose built auto dryers, leaf blowers and/or using some special attachment for my shop air compressor.
That's probably a great idea because if your car has a good coat of wax the forced air finale at the touchless washes works amazingly well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Touch-free car wash (I'm very picky as to which) followed by a quick wipedown with quality spray detailer. Car washes get your underpinnings where a hand wash can't. Waxed twice a year. Always garaged, and that is important.

My brother-in-law is a professional body-fender guy who agrees with me that hand-waxing is better and faster than using an orbital buffer -- don't waste your time, though they're cheap at WalMart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
It would be nice to hand-wash, but that would require a) a hose, or b) a relatively close distance between your kitchen sink and where ever the car is. Since my car is normally parked several blocks from my apartment, neither of those are an option. You'd be amazed how difficult it is to hand-wash a car when you have to carry water, a bucket at a time, a half-mile to where your car is parked. I haven't hand-washed a car in ten years. I take it to an old-fashioned, electric motorized brushes car was once every three months or so -- let the grime build up until you can't tell what color the car is anymore, then go and get it washed off. Anything more than that is just a waste of money.
 
1 - 20 of 225 Posts
Top