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Discussion Starter #1
whenever i turn the stock radio on in my 74 mustang all i get is an annoying buzzing sound i think the speakers are shot. i also want to get a better radio with aux ports but i want to keep the original look. any tips on how to replace the speakers and how to maybe hide a newer radio
 

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It could be the antenna connection. Those go and all you pick up is static.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i dont think its the antenna because the volume wont change and it is very quiet.
 
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You are talking about a 38 year old radio.

Your best bet is going to be to replace it.

Now with what, that's entirely up to you.

Some dig up a working old unit and get lucky in that it lasts for awhile.

Some cut the dash and put a modern stereo in.

Some are so against cutting the dash that they leave the defunct stock unit in the hole install a modern stereo under the dash or in the glovebox.

Some, like me, are lucky enough to find N.O.S. aftermarket shaft-type head units somewhere that work and install those with upgraded speakers.

Some, also like me (in my '75 Thunderbird) build hidden systems while leaving the stock system in place. (MP3 player loaded with music, mini stereo-to-RCA cable, 200w 2-channel amp, and two 6x9 speakers in custom boxes. Everything was hidden from sight, with only the stereo mini plug end of that cable visible. MP3 player went with me in my pocket, and acted as the head unit when plugged in, volume control and all.) One of these days I'll get around to doing a tech write-up on how to do these, as I've done several for myself and others. I keep not getting it done as life gets in the way though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
if you could sometime get a little tutorial of how to do the last one i would be extremely grateful because that would be a perfect solution for me but if you could try to get it up within the next couple of weeks it would be perfect because we are replacing the interior in about two weeks but if you cant its alright.
ps. thank you in advance:yelpleased:
 
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Allright, I'll use links to examples of the products since it's rained here for the last two days and I haven't had a chance to take pictures.

To start with, you'll need an amplifier.

The amp doesn't have to be incredibly powerful, 200 watts max will fill a Mustang II with plenty of sound driving a decent pair of 6 1/2" or 6x9 speakers. If you want it to be completely hidden, it will have to also be fairly small, and small amps don't tend to be all that powerful.

A nice, small, reasonably powerful amp would be one like this:
Amazon.com: Boss Audio R1004 4-Channel Mosfet Power Amplifier with Remote Subwoofer Level Control: Automotive This one from Boss would be more than powerful enough, and has four channels, meaning you could go so far as to hook up four speakers to it.

Next, you'll need a cable like this one: Amazon.com: Compatible CVR205/AH205 Audio Y-Cable, 3.5mm Mini-Stereo Plug to Twin RCA Plugs: Baby
A cable like that will take the stereo output from an MP3 player, cell phone, Ipod, CD player, hell, even an old cassette player, and transfer it to the amp. Simply plug in the RCA leads to the inputs on the amp, and have the other end where you can get to it so you can plug it into your device.

After that, I'd recommend getting an amplifier install kit. You can do all the wiring without it, but these all-in-one kits are getting so much cheaper these days than buying individual packs of wire at a parts store, and come with the inline fuse holder already installed. This one Amazon.com: Boss KIT-2 Complete 8 Gauge Amplifier Installation Kit: Car Electronics would actually be overkill for the amp I listed above, just make sure the kit you buy is rated for the power requirements of the amp you're using.

Next, you'll need speakers. From here you've got lots of choices. You can order new speakers to fit the factory holes, you can cut new holes to fit bigger speakers, you can order boxes to hold the speakers and put them in the rear floorboards (that's what I did on mine), you can go with two speakers and a 2-channel amp, 4 speakers and a 4-channel amp, the choice is completely yours.

Now that you have all these things, install your speakers first, then run their wires all to where you're going to install the amp. I like to do a clean install, so I end up pulling interior trim, and running the wires out-of-sight. I highly recommend at least securing them where they won't get tangled in someone's feet if you don't want to go that far. Hooking them up to the amp is simple, match positive to positive, negative to negative, and what position (left or right, and front or rear if you go 4-channel) the speaker's in.

Next, install your amp wiring kit, follow the instructions that come with it other than the part about the RCA cables (you won't need them, we're using the mini-stereo-to-RCA cable) and the "remote" wire. When it comes to hooking up the "remote" wire, you've got a handful of choices.

1. Mount a bracket on the amp to hold a toggle switch, and run a wire fom the battery + terminal to the switch, then another from the switch to the "remote" terminal on the amp. This allows even the switch for the amp to remain hidden, and gives you a quick "on-off" for it. The downside is, if you forget to turn it off, it'll run your battery down.

2. Mount the switch on the dash, in the ashtray, or somewhere else more accessible. The downside here is having to run a lot of extra wire. I recommend using an inline fuse between the Batt+ terminal and the switch if you do this, because of the fact that there would be a somewhat increased risk of a short with the extra wiring.

3. Forgo the switch altogether, and run the wire from an ignition hot source so that the amp automatically turns on when you turn the key. This is the most convenient option, but also means you can't turn the amp off if you're having an electrical issue (very possible with a car this old.)

Once you get it all hooked up, turn it on, and turn on your music source. Your music source will be your "head unit" controlling the volume and content. Adjust the settings on the amp using the supplied directions in the manual that comes with it, until you're satisfied with the sound.

That's it. That's the big secret to a hidden audio system with all the modern conveniences on a budget. The whole thing can be done with components from Wal-Mart for under $120 (including the MP3 player itself) or as fancy an extravagant as you want to make it depending on how deep your pockets are, and how good you are at wiring audio equipment.

I've run several systems like this over the years, even going so far as to leave the empty hole in the dash on my '75 Chevy when I took the stock stereo out after it died, and with them completely hidden, and the actual "head unit" in your pocket when you leave the car, there's nothing to be stolen, or to even draw a thief's attention when you park your car.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thank you so much ill probably be going to get the parts tomorrow ill post some pictures of it when im finished:bigthumbsup
 
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Hey, glad I could help.

If I may make a suggestion, turn your music player down to just above the minimum when starting it for the first time, as different amps are set differently by default, and different music players put out different levels of sound. Start the gain adjustment on the amp (if it has one) just above the lowest level too. Turn both up a little at a time until you've got the music player maxed out, and the gain on the amp as high as it can go while still sounding good (no popping or distortion from the speakers) then, depending on what all adjustments the amp has, as well as your music player, you can fine-tune your sound (you may have to go back and turn the gain down again, especially if you dial in more bass).

I'm a music junkie, my daily driver (1999 GMC Sierra) has an in-dash MP3 player with a 16gb USB flash drive filled with music. (It also has 10 total speakers in it, and I'm about to expand to 12, I've currently got a 6.5" three way and separate tweeter in each door, a 4x6 in each head panel, two 8" subs and two 4" tweeters in a box behind the seats powered by their own amp, and I'm about to add a second amp and a pair of 6x9s in boxes back there too.) 99.9% of the music on the drive wasn't downloaded, but ripped from CDs I own (I own about 750 or so at last count) as well as 45s and LPs... (Yeah... it's a sickness... lol)

Also, I had another thought on the remote wire for the amp.

You could do a mix of #1 and #3.

Run a wire from an ignition hot source to a switch, and then a wire from the switch to the amp.

That way, if something happens, like an alternator failure, you can flip the switch to conserve battery power to get where you're going.
 
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