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The #*!(@#) who painted the passenger door on my "all original" 68 screwed up and painted the interior the same color as the exterior. The genius also slathered bondo over the grain (thick too). I have pulled the panel, masked that sucker off, stripped it (that aircraft stripper is something else-- but it even takes work on Bondo) and revealed a beautiful, pristine grained door panel. While I'm at it, I'm replacing the window felts, hardware and regulator -- but my question is -- to paint the interior side of the door and keep the grain (I'm spraycanning it) how much and what kind of primer do you recommend -- or should I dispense with primer and go straight to color. I can't believe the "painter" committed this atrocity -- and don't want to commit one myself.

Any suggestions?
 

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most primers are going to fill the grain, thats what they do. i would do it without, for better effect. yea, that aircraft stripper is some bad stuff!
 

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Don't you love the aircraft stripper? I know a primer that most likely wouldn't fill in the grain. It's for models, so it comes in a small can but it is great stuff. It's called Tamiya. And if you put it on in several light mist coats, then it shouldn't fill in the grain.
 

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If you are stripped to bare metal you NEED primer , the paint will not adhere well without it .
Properly applied in light coats it will not fill the grain :)
 

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Use a very fine primer, hopefully in a colour very close to the top coat you're going to apply. Then lightly top coat just enough to cover the primer without any show thru. Also try not to apply a " wet " top coat as this will dry shiny. The original was a duller finish.
 

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My interior color is charcoal black metallic and I purchased three spray cans from NPD. All three cans were defective and the paint would come out mostly clear with a light dirty gray metallic tinge. THANK GOD, I did a test shot on some scrap prior to applying the paint to my interior panels. Be sure to check the paint before you spray your interior....or you may find using that aircraft stripper again.

The body shop where my car is at decided they would go ahead and take care of the interior paint themselves. I got them the proper color code and they are well aware that the grain is to be preserved.

Use a light coat of primer to provide a base for the final paint. Since I was shooting black, I used a black primer as well.

Here's a pic of the black primer coat. Paint was very thin and didn't coat completely, but all you need is to give your final paint something to grip.

Good Luck
 

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I had the same problem when I painted my doors..........the first time.

The trick is to use an acid etch primer. It won't give that high build that other primers were designed to do (to make sanding and filling scratches easier).

Apply a light coat and make sure you use a decent gun when spraying. Also, go for a matte or semi-gloss on the doors, a gloss will look out of place.

Acid etch primer can be found at professional supply houses.

Michael
 
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