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Hi, Im new to these forums (great forums, nice people from what i can tell). I'm only 16 and am looking to purchase a late 1960's mustang(want a f/b but will end up with a coupe).. the one's I'm interested in aren't in great shape, they do need a lot of work. I was just wondering how long did it take you (if you restored a mustang) to restore it. I mean like completely restore it. engine, exterior, interior. everthing? :shiny:
 

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This is my advise to you. Im 17 and im young too. Body work is expensive. Go for a car that needs minimal body work. Mechanical work is easy, even if you dont know how to do it you can figure it out or theres lots of peopel who do know how who enjoy it who you might meet whod lend you a helping hand (I sure would). body work is expensive, you have to know how to do it and you generally will not do it for anyone for free. Almost anything other than body work can be done without having the actual talent to do it so long as you approach it in a smart way, that is take it slow and ask all questions before hand. Your total time will depend on how much work needs to be done, how quickly you work, and how anxious you are to finish and of coruse the magic dollar. If youre like me your car will be on the road before its completed for sure. :wavey:bigthumbsup
 

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This is my advise to you. Im 17 and im young too. Body work is expensive. Go for a car that needs minimal body work. Mechanical work is easy, even if you dont know how to do it you can figure it out or theres lots of peopel who do know how who enjoy it who you might meet whod lend you a helping hand (I sure would). body work is expensive, you have to know how to do it and you generally will not do it for anyone for free. Almost anything other than body work can be done without having the actual talent to do it so long as you approach it in a smart way, that is take it slow and ask all questions before hand. Your total time will depend on how much work needs to be done, how quickly you work, and how anxious you are to finish and of coruse the magic dollar. If youre like me your car will be on the road before its completed for sure. :wavey:bigthumbsup
Alrite thanks..I do have alot of family that work at body shops so if i do need help i can just ask someone..but i think ill just try and purchase one that doesn't need much body work..(although the 700 dollar one is gonna kill me to pass up) but thats ok..Thanks for the advice:bigthumbsup
 

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I agree with 302theboss, i got my first mustang 2 years ago when i was 15 and the one thing that kills me is the body work.
 

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just takes little bondo skill or if u go the toold sheetmetal working. honestly im 15 also i do this as a father son thing alot of times if u can get a shell of a old mustang you may be able to get a good motor from either a later car or something you just looking to have a fun restore back to stock or do a restomod? honestly i like the restomod idea bc the I6 which you will most likely find isn't as lovely as the v8. and don't worry what u can probobly do is get a good block and build up from that unless ur on a tight budget...which u still might be able to that. i hope u find a good car to restore. it takes time of course how much time depends on how much $ u got
 

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Restoration

Hi guys,

I restored my 69 convertible and documented the entire process with photos and text just for guys like you. It was a fairly extensive restoration including frame rails, shock towers, body, engine tranny etc. So take a look at my web site below. If your car has rusted out body parts odds are it needs more than sheetmetal, it most likely will need things like seat pans, maybe shock towers, rails etc, which is more than the sheetmetal. Actually sheetmetal does take alot of time to do right but its the structure of the car you need to consider first as that will assure the care is safe AND looks good. As for Bondo it is unavoidable but dont lean on it for all your repairs. For example the lower corners of the doors if they are rusted weld in new metal and then grind smooth and then use bondo to get the final details smooth. Nothin wrong with bondo, in the old days they used lead and that was just to hard to work with. Bondo done correctly can result in high quality work, but don't overuse it...filling in huge holes with it and goop ing it on. If you have any questions you have done the right thing and started on the right foot by asking in places like this for advice. Its a great feeling to bring one of these cars back to life and its worth the work, good luck!!

Dan
 

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Hello.:) It's really rather difficult to say how long it will take, because every car is different, and every person is different. My first car, a 66 model 6cyl three speed coupe, took me about two years to get it to where it could be driven safely. To get it to 'finished' took another several months. But, I started on the car when I was thirteen, and my schedule called for having it finished when I got my license. The car I'm driving now only took me about six months. But, it had a rock-solid, straight-as-a-pin body. It had been sitting in a barn for about 25 years, so it needed everything, but the body was in super condition. And, through an oversight by the local vermin population, the top was still good. I don't know how that happened.:headscratch: But, what I did to this one was rebuild the motor, tranny and rear end, go through the brakes, steering and suspension and replace everything that needed it, sort out all of the electrical systems and get everything doing what it was supposed to do, fluff up the interior and then paint the car. But, there were a whole bunch of cars in between my first one and my current one, so it's really kind of hard to say. The big variable would be you. It would depend on your time, finances and abilities, and there is a huge difference between this person and that one when it comes to those things. Good luck.:)
 

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The First car I restored was a 1954 Ford Crestline, it took me about three months of basic non-stop work to get it to a nice safe car that looked good. If you are looking for a driver and have the funds you can get it done in months, if you are looking for a show winner, you could be looking at years, plus an investment in some major tools.
 

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Another bit of advice. If you want a V8 powered car, buy one that already has it. Otherwise the whole drive train and suspension will need replacement and the conversion will be time consuming, costly and finding all of the parts needed will be a real pain. The only practical and cost effective way to change over is to have a V8 parts car. There is so much difference between the two that other than the sheetmetal they are really different cars.
 
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