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Discussion Starter #1
My throw out bearing is going out, so I ordered a new SPEC stage 1 clutch kit and a STEEDA firewall clutch cable adjuster kit. All from AmericanMuscle. I didn't order the flywheel yet because I didn't have the money at the time. So my question is, should I order an aluminum flywheel? I know the benefits of having one, but I read somewhere that its not really practical for a a street car. The thread stated that you might have idle problems. Are they right? If so, which flywheel should I get? My 02 GT is bone stock, but I figured if I'm in there I might as well get the aluminum one. Thanks guys
 

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My throw out bearing is going out, so I ordered a new SPEC stage 1 clutch kit and a STEEDA firewall clutch cable adjuster kit. All from AmericanMuscle. I didn't order the flywheel yet because I didn't have the money at the time. So my question is, should I order an aluminum flywheel? I know the benefits of having one, but I read somewhere that its not really practical for a a street car. The thread stated that you might have idle problems. Are they right? If so, which flywheel should I get? My 02 GT is bone stock, but I figured if I'm in there I might as well get the aluminum one. Thanks guys
the only downside i've noticed to having the spec aluminum f/w is a little more vibration at an idle, and at certain rpm's/speed's you'll hear a little bit of drivetrain noise. nothing much though. it idles the same as before.

if anything it actually makes the car easier to drive, easier start-off's, easier shifts, easier acceleration. and if your going to install this yourself like i did, definitely do the clutch and flywheel at the same time. there's no reason to take the clutch out twice. if you dont buy one at least resurface your stock one.
 

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i have a fidanza aluminum flywheel and loce it. it is smooth and hasnt affected the idle at all. i havent found a reason not to have it, becuase it really does seem to make everything easier like what 232-k7 mentioned
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Did you do the install yourself? I am going that route and Ive heard alot about people havin vibration problems. Any tricks or tips for the install?
 

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if you don't put the aluminum flywheel on when you change your clutch out then get your old one resurfaced...if you don't or forget like i did you will be taking it back apart again lol. the install is pretty easy once you get to it....
 

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The Spec Stage 1 is an awesome clutch. We sell a ton of them and I run one on my daily driver. The pedal effort is light but the clamping force and holding power is incredible. :bigthumbsup

As for aluminum on the street, I would not recommend them. You've heard the others chime in who have them and they are fine with them but in my experience, it does make a difference. The deal with aluminum is because it is so light, it doesn't hold any inertia as compared to a stock cast one or even a billet steel wheel. In other words, when you push in the clutch to change gears, the rpm's fall flat almost instantly. Launching off the line is harder too because of the lack of inertia. You have to keep the rpm's up in order to launch and not stall.
All of this qualities are great in race trim, but for the street, it takes some getting used to. I personally have not heard of an idle issue before though? :scratchchin

Good luck in whichever you choose but if it were me and I had a stock stang like you, I wouldn't waste the money on an aluminum wheel as you won't reap the benefits being stock. :bigthumbsup



Richard
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Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
 

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I run a fidanza aluminum flywheel and have nothing but good to say for it. No chage in idle quality or any other drawbacks. My car isn't stock, pretty much all the bolt-ons, but the rpms don't drop off much differently and launching isn't any harder, I have a lot of wheelspin as it is, but for a stock configuration that might be a concern. Even driveability hasn't suffered, its easy to start from a stop and smooth shifting, but again, that may have something to do with it working well with the mods I have. My car is far from a racecar, just a moderately modded daily driver that sees some track time and a lot of highway time, but IMO I would go with the aluminum flywhell, I've been very happy with it. On the other hand though, you can't go wrong listening to Richard, he really knows his stuff and as far as tranny's go I take his word as the gospel, every time I have disagreed other than the flywheel a little research and asking around has proved him right.
 

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I run a fidanza aluminum flywheel and have nothing but good to say for it. No chage in idle quality or any other drawbacks. My car isn't stock, pretty much all the bolt-ons, but the rpms don't drop off much differently and launching isn't any harder, I have a lot of wheelspin as it is, but for a stock configuration that might be a concern. Even driveability hasn't suffered, its easy to start from a stop and smooth shifting, but again, that may have something to do with it working well with the mods I have. My car is far from a racecar, just a moderately modded daily driver that sees some track time and a lot of highway time, but IMO I would go with the aluminum flywhell, I've been very happy with it. On the other hand though, you can't go wrong listening to Richard, he really knows his stuff and as far as tranny's go I take his word as the gospel, every time I have disagreed other than the flywheel a little research and asking around has proved him right.


There you go.... another vote to go for it. As far as people I trust and listen to their advice, racin366, rlg34750, eagleauto and tripleblack are the ones I would heed their word. :bigthumbsup





Richard
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Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There you go.... another vote to go for it. As far as people I trust and listen to their advice, racin366, rlg34750, eagleauto and tripleblack are the ones I would heed their word. :bigthumbsup





Richard
Tech Support
Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
After seeing your sig I think it would probably be in my best interest to take your advice. I have a question for you then. If not the aluminum flywheel, which one should I get? And also, I dont plan on keeping my car stock for long. Do you think getting the aluminum one would be a good move in prep for the add-ons to come? Thanks in advance for the advice man
 

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Personally I think its a good move to get the aluminum one, but if you decide not to its probably best to just get the stock one resurfaced, it is important to have a new surface when you install a new clutch.
 

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LOL, this is about the ONLY thing I have seen where 366 and I even partially disagree, so I'm going to make this one of my patented, long posts.

I LOVE making cars (and the drivetrain) lighter by upgrading to lighter parts. Driveshafts for instance. But I usually limit this sort of thing on essentially stock daily drivers to a dollar/benefit analysis (I once posted a really cool matematical model for this, complete with 7th grade math instructions, but that's really off topic for now).

My discomfort with swapping in a much lighter flywheel is primarily with the lack of experience the buyer often has with the end results. This particular mod has a LOT to do with the driver and how they drive - and subtle differences between individuals. I usually recommend the person take a test spin with a Mustang Club buddy (if you don't already belong, visit the next meeting of your local club - many are listed on www.mustang.org ).

Some folks will love the much peakier driving experience - others will find it drives them crazy in their mostly stop-and-go driving pattern - while (LOL) the more oblivious will notice no big difference and wonder why they spent all that money!

If the money isn't an important consideration, and you have no way to test drive a similar car with a lightweight flywheel, you might consider a compromise: A billet steel flywheel.

If money IS a consideration, I suggest you find out the difference in cost between resurfacing your old flywheel and the new item, and then look at what that money would mean if put toward some other modification or goal you are wanting.

In the end, its one of those judgement calls that is best made AFTER you gain some firsthand experience.
 

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Tripleblack gave the best option so far. :bigthumbsup

As I said above, of all the members on here, there are only a few that I trust without question when it comes to getting tech help. Racin366, Rlg34750, Tripleblack and EagleAuto.
Racin366 obviously loves the way his car performs but TB brought up an excellent point. If you have the chance to drive a car that has an aluminum F/W in it before you spend that kind of money, it would make more sense to do that.

You asked me what to get if you did not go with aluminum? Personally, I would go with a Billet Steel wheel. The stock cast one weighs in at about 37-40lbs. The billet wheels, like the ones we sell, weigh in at 28-30lbs. A little bit of a weight savings but no so much that it effects the inertai that I talked about in my 1st response.

Thank you for the vote of confidence based on my sig but as I state in my sig, it is dang near impossible for me to diagnose an issue or in this case, even recommend a particular part, over the internet. Like alot guys here (racin366, Reggie, Eagleauto and Stan (TB)), I have alot of experience to fall back on and in my case, I happen to specialize in transmission and driveline. I get alot of feedback from our customers, those who went with aluminum and those that didn't and the one thing that is common across the board is that the ones who went aluminum, all called me back to tell me I was right on the money in my assesment of what was going to happen. Some got used to it and like Racin366, they love it, others did not and actually ended up switching back to a billet wheel.
I don't want you to take my word or advice as gospel, I just want you to consider what I am saying when making your decision. :bigthumbsup




Richard
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Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
 

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One of the mods should make this a sticky, both sides of the situation have been thoroughly covered, and I really can't think of anything that hasn't been said well here, I get the feeling this thread can be a lot of help to anyone considering flywheel options. As always, a pleasure comparing notes with you guys, unusual to be on opposite sides though, but admittedly, this is a truly subjective matter and like tripleblack and Richard said, it depends most on the driver's style and likes/dislikes. Out of everyone on here, I trust the opinions of rj886, Rlg34750, Tripleblack and EagleAuto, they really know what they're talking about and don't make guesses and present them as fact. Too bad Randy Stinchcomb isn't around anymore, he also was a fountain of good info.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Ok, first of all, thanks a lot guys for all the spot on advice. Here is where Im at right now. This car is my DD so if I were to get my wheel resurfaced I would have to get it out and get it resurfaced and back in all in one weekend. I like the advice from tripleblack tryin to find a car with an aluminum flywheel in it. I dont know anybody off the top of my head, but my driving style is pretty much balls out! Pedal to the floor and shifting at almost redline. If Im gettin on it, I like to keep the rpms high. I have a stock shifter and worn out stock clutch and my shifts are still faster than a lot of my buddies. On takeoff, I don't like to dump it, but I also don't like ridin the crap out of clutch either. Im right in between. I usually start to let it out around 3000-3500. That being said, do you think the aluminum would suit my driving style? I also agree with racin366, lets make it a sticky! This thread has definitely educated me a lot more on flywheels and Im sure it could help out a lot of other guys too. Thanks again guys!
 

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Unlike the topic of flywheels, I have no qualm in telling you to dump the stock shifter. This is particularly true if you go with a lighter (either steel or aluminum) flywheel. That extra time to move the shifter from gear-to-gear will be FELT as the rpms fall much quicker than you are used to. A 'snik-snik' short throw shifter will help this problem, and needless to say, prevent some missed shifts.

Its my opinion that very GOOD drivers who have mastered power shifting and who use subtle methods (like feathering the clutch to control the rpm curve) taking place instinctively in the very small time increments between well-planned shifts will quickly integrate the lightweight flywheel in their driving style. Those who come to driving these cars from, say, fast motorcycles will feel right at home. The PROCESS of driving changes, emulating road racing in fact - and that can be fun.

I've often considered this option for my own car, particularly back before I wrecked my left knee and was planning on some runs around Road Atlanta.

If, as you say, you like to keep the rpms high, this will require more shifts and work than currently should you elect an aluminum flywheel. MORE shifts will be needed to keep the engine within the sweet spot on the power curve. This is a phenomenon which partially explains the popularity of 6+ gear transmissions and paddle shifters on high performance exotics, who have similar free-revving characteristics and driving duties.

I don't think ANYONE can make this choice for you. I notice you live near a good size city - check that link I posted to the Mustang Club of America and look into attending their next meeting. I would bet money there will be at least one kind soul there with a late model GT fitted with an aluminum flywheel.

Ok, first of all, thanks a lot guys for all the spot on advice. Here is where Im at right now. This car is my DD so if I were to get my wheel resurfaced I would have to get it out and get it resurfaced and back in all in one weekend. I like the advice from tripleblack tryin to find a car with an aluminum flywheel in it. I dont know anybody off the top of my head, but my driving style is pretty much balls out! Pedal to the floor and shifting at almost redline. If Im gettin on it, I like to keep the rpms high. I have a stock shifter and worn out stock clutch and my shifts are still faster than a lot of my buddies. On takeoff, I don't like to dump it, but I also don't like ridin the crap out of clutch either. Im right in between. I usually start to let it out around 3000-3500. That being said, do you think the aluminum would suit my driving style? I also agree with racin366, lets make it a sticky! This thread has definitely educated me a lot more on flywheels and Im sure it could help out a lot of other guys too. Thanks again guys!
 

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very good info here :bigthumbsup i tend to trust rj886/*richard* when it comes to anything transmission and driveline... the guy is really smart... i personally can shift without the clutch without grinding a single gear...and as a poor guy i spend the 100 bucks at Steeda for a new cast flywheel (just to make sure i dont have any heated stress cracks under my resurfacing on a stock one) and call it a day... im the type of driver that feathers the rpms no more than 950 on level ground to take off unless im hammerin it lol i let the clutch out a little then pick the rpms up a little and i personally dont mind a cast iron flywheel due to the inertia theory, i can hammer on my car and when i throw the clutch in to shift around 5 or 6k and catch the next gear by the time i am still around the 4500 power band with a cast iron flywheel... in a mostly stock car with average bolt ons but i also am yet to drive soemthing with an aluminum flywheel too sooo ya just throwin in my 2 cents :bigthumbsup
thanks again for the good info in this thread everyone
 

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your best bet for long life is steel have it resufaced and you will be go to go:bigthumbsup
 

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Dam I went with 12 pound flywheel, is lighter, aluminum. it free up horse power I can burn the tires so easily, pulls quicker all the way to the max. I recommend it but at first you will need to get used to it. I recommend changing the driveshaft too. Ive' seen billet steel flywheels that weigh only 12 lbs too just look it up.
 

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Dam I went with 12 pound flywheel, is lighter, aluminum. it free up horse power I can burn the tires so easily, pulls quicker all the way to the max. I recommend it but at first you will need to get used to it. I recommend changing the driveshaft too. Ive' seen billet steel flywheels that weigh only 12 lbs too just look it up.
If saving weight in the drivetrain is a goal, I would recommend going with the lightweight driveshaft FIRST. Unlike the flywheel, the driveshaft is downstream of the clutch, and will have only positive effects on driveability in a daily driver.
 

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For a bolt on GT that see's alot of street use, a set of 4.10s, FRPP aluminum driveshaft, clutch rated for 400hp, and a fidanza aluminum flywheel is a sweet setup. Don't forget to change the pilot bearing while you're in there!
 
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