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Greetings all. Im an old rod kinda guy, in fact I restore late 60's and 70's muscle cars and Harleys, so I know my way around vehicles pretty good. That is until I bought a 2000 V6 for the wifey the other day. I get it from a car stand point but what im asking here is more a list of bolt on or easy mods that will increase HP. We own three big block FE Fords already so I understand the whole V8 vs V6 debate. The Mrs doesnt need a V8 considering she already has a heavy foot and spun the V6 out on the ice last week haha. I have a reputation to uphold and cant have a doggy V6, I need some balls when im driving.

Anyway a list of mods, packages or recommendations, by brand with their corresponding HP increase would help me map out my upgrade. I have plans for CAI, exhaust, tuner, 4:10 gears and so on, but humor me and give me the break down including the very basics.

I think this would help more than me and if some of you have a package or combination of things that gave you real good results id be in debt to you for sharing. Thanks all.
 

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Gears is absolutely the best you can do for a V6!!!!!!

a little about tuners (although you will need one to correct for the diff gear swap) & CAI's
It is important to verify the “Tuner” is ASE certified in ECM & Trans programming & current. Plenty of persons advertise their programs to be the best & offer custom tunes, but very few have credentials in these areas. Some of these “geniuses” have caused damage to a few vehicles- just jump over to flatratetech.com & read comments from the MSE techs!

Roush Dyno Tune Posted August 26, 2012
Bad situation-Need help! - Vintage Mustang Forums
To make an extremely long story short. I need someone to tell me who to talk to for help. I have posted several times and got a lot of help. Got my engine build finished in May. Ran great. Took it to Roush Racing for a tune. It is a 93, efi, 302 with several upgrades. Went to get it from Roush and the water hose had blown and torn up my brand new hood I just had painted. It can be fixed. Drove the car home and it would not start the next day. Finally found the adapter between the TPS and painless harness was missing. Fixed that. It would not idle consistently. Took it back to Roush. They said it was fixed. Went less than 1/2 mile and it was idling at 2500 rpm. Took it back. They were lost. I need help. I am totally disgusted. If you need to talk, PM me and I will give you all my personal contact info. Thanks for any help. I am out of options.

This is not limited to Roush, most of the more "popular" tuners have similar stories...and these are the same guys who will come up with every PR response when you try to pin them down on their specific credentials. Blue Oval Chips (Blue Oval Chips, Inc.) and Ford Motorsports are the two I would recommend for tune by USPS.

Perhaps what is equally important is the parameters that can be adjusted are set by the OEM vehicle software…so there is really no “magic” in what they are doing anyway. If you look at the dyno charts from many of these supposed HP/TQ increases, they are typically around 5%-7% at peak rpm ranges…….guess what, 5% is a standard deviation even amongst mfg dynos and if you go to this link http://www.fordracingparts.com/download/tipsPDF/EnginePerformanceTechTips.pdf the engineers at Ford racing have a article on just exactly how these “tuners” play games with the hp/tq ratings, how calibration can cause misleading dyno results, & some of the “tricks” that are used to gain supposed power increases when in fact, mis-managing your engine….. and the most important item is……these “expert tuners” (at least most) do not have or choose not to test their results (in comparison to the oem intakes) during actual vehicle motion (or simulation- such as a wind tunnel) as the oems do nor are these "mail order tuners' regulated like any other auto repair shop in the US...so if they "damage" your car...gee, sorry...sue me!

IMHO, if you live near any major city there are excellent tuning specialists with dynos who for the same price (if not less) will tune your vehicle taking into consideration your specific needs including environmental conditions, for your specific vehicle. IMHO, the best bang for the buck!

If you are comfortable and understand how to tune a vehicle, you can also do this yourself. There are several software programs available, that “Speak Common English” that will allow you to tune your vehicles ECM. One company is HP Tuners, they have a website….they offer two core programs, one for those who are doing dyno tuning and one for the home-garage mechanic (which is priced at about the same as most of the “canned tunes on the market) …this version limits the span of adjustments as a safeguard against doing something outside of the oem scope……basically, keeps you from doing something “too stupid by accident” (grin) and Sniper Delta Force Tuning Software.

I would avoid oil impregnated filters. While they have their purpose in off-road applications, Ford/GM/Dodge all have “watch-out” bulletins where the oil has contaminated intake sensors. - they even have a training video for the techs on this (flatratetech.com) .

If you look at the flow data, WIX HP filters flow 98+% of K&N and have a much smoother flow post filter plus excellent filtering, for a fraction of the price!

Testand Corporation conducted an ISO standards test on automotive air filters which can be viewed at this link: Duramax Air Filter Testing * - Diesel Bombers.

“After only 24 minutes the K&N had accumulated 221gms of dirt but passed 7.0gms. Compared to the AC, the K&N “plugged up” nearly 3 times faster, passed 18 times more dirt and captured 37% less dirt.”

The OE’s have an excellent air intake system. What many view as an issue (is the plastic intake tube with its noise canceling design) actually increases air pressure. It is the same hydraulic concept used by fire fighters creating water supply where psi is low. By having the air cross the path at a 90 degree angle, the pressure is increased proportionally. Fire fighters use what is called a “4-way valve” or “Blake Valve” at the hydrant where the water is cycled through the fire engine (pump) and sent back into the valve crossing the water flow at a 90 degree angle. In this case it also acts as a sound canceling device! At low speeds, this can reduce the flow a tad (which is what most “feel”), but in terms of peak hp/tq, a good high flow filter is all that is needed. You can use a WIX OEM HP replacement filter in the OEM plastic manifold box and either remove the plastic tube and replace it with a piece of pipe/hose, etc or remove the tube completely and replace the tube by building an air ram type intake into the air box manifold (where the pipe use to attach)- make sure ti terminates above the fan shroud to avoid water intake or fan induced pulsations.
 
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