Ford Mustang Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
Does anyone know how to decypher these build sheets??
my 65 GT Fastback.
It was built in the Metuchen, NJ factory June 65. I have the original dealer purchase order quote signed by salesman and original owner, Deposit check, and factory build sheet computer card. I just can't understand how to verify the info.
781327
 

·
Registered
1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
Joined
·
2,868 Posts
Wow, that is super cool! I'm enough of a nerd to understand how that card would work, and what it was for, but as for "reading it" - well, your guess is as good as mine. I am sure that when read by the correct computer, it would give you information, but I can tell you that the punch holes do not correspond with any printed data on the card itself, as far as their location is concerned. In other words, reading it 'by eye' won't tell you what the punches mean, and only the custom software they were running could probably make any sense of the information on the card.

The printed information at the top of the page probably does correspond with the numbers those punches would encode, if I had to guess.

Still, what a neat piece of history! I didn't even know Ford was using any significant computerization in '65!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
I think the punched holes provide the data to print on the card. The car rolls down the line and the person installing #43 looks at the card and sees a "6" and installs what is listed down below as a number 6. That continues down the assembly line. It shows block #44 is for the transmission and a "6" is printed in the block above it. Look down below and it shows a number 6 is a " speed manual transmission" (can't tell from the photo but it either says 3 or 4 speed transmission). Next is block #45 for the rear axle and it has a "4."

That is just a guess, but most of the information for building the car and what to install is on the card, at least for the production line worker.
 

·
Registered
1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
Joined
·
2,868 Posts
I think the punched holes provide the data to print on the card. The car rolls down the line and the person installing #43 looks at the card and sees a "6" and installs what is listed down below as a number 6. That continues down the assembly line. It shows block #44 is for the transmission and a "6" is printed in the block above it. Look down below and it shows a number 6 is a " speed manual transmission" (can't tell from the photo but it either says 3 or 4 speed transmission). Next is block #45 for the rear axle and it has a "4."

That is just a guess, but most of the information for building the car and what to install is on the card, at least for the production line worker.
That's pretty much it. The "holes" in the card, though, are read by a computer, which did not have the ability to read any of the print. Instead, it looked at the locations of the holes, which corresponded to values it could look up (probably in each row, though perhaps in each column). How that information was to be used, I am not sure, because in this age, data storage was on reel-to-reel magnetic tapes at best, and was of limited utility. Perhaps it was used for accounting purposes? Who knows.

Like you said, I bet the numbers on the top of the card correspond to the hole values. Simple things like "Field #43 has a value of '6" " that the computer could read. But card readers were expensive, and not something you'd put on a dirty assembly line!

The printed stuff would be useful to people building the car, but then again, so would a simple piece of paper without the computer punchcard holes. So I am genuinely curious about how this card was used, and by whom!
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top