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Hello. :) A lot of people find that bleeding the brakes on their old Mustang can be a very annoying and frustrating task to accomplish successfully at home, myself included. :gringreen So, I made a power brake bleeder for my car that hooks up to an air compressor. I made it out of very cheap and readily available stuff, it is simple to assemble and it works extremely well. And no, I am not trying to sell anybody anything. :nogrinner I'm just showing people how I did it, so that they can also do it. Here are some pictures and a description. :)
The Care and Feeding of Ponies: Bleeding the brakes 1965 1966 Mustang
 

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Good idea, now that's thinking outside the square.
 

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Hello. :) A lot of people find that bleeding the brakes on their old Mustang can be a very annoying and frustrating task to accomplish successfully at home, myself included. :gringreen So, I made a power brake bleeder for my car that hooks up to an air compressor. I made it out of very cheap and readily available stuff, it is simple to assemble and it works extremely well. And no, I am not trying to sell anybody anything. :nogrinner I'm just showing people how I did it, so that they can also do it. Here are some pictures and a description. :)
The Care and Feeding of Ponies: Bleeding the brakes 1965 1966 Mustang

Great idea! years ago, I had a kit that, wherein, the air was supplied by a spare tire. Same basic idea, but, there was not air regulation which could cause too high of pressure. Which leads me to the question....What pressure do your use? I read through your "how to", but, see what you regulated the pressure.
Thanks for sharing..
 

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Hi again. :) I just use the pressure regulator as sort of an on/off switch. I start out with the pressure set at zero and, once I open the bleeder valve, I open the valve of the regulator a bit. I never really looked to see at what pressure I stop turning the valve knob, but, it would certainly be much less than the 32 p.s.i. of a properly inflated tire. It doesn't take much pressure to push the fluid through. A carburetor works because of the pressure differential of the 14ish p.s.i. of normal atmospheric pressure and the lower pressure at the discharge nozzles of the venturi. That difference can't be more than 5 or 6 p.s.i. but is sufficient to push fuel through the carb. :)
 

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Hi again. :) I just use the pressure regulator as sort of an on/off switch. I start out with the pressure set at zero and, once I open the bleeder valve, I open the valve of the regulator a bit. I never really looked to see at what pressure I stop turning the valve knob, but, it would certainly be much less than the 32 p.s.i. of a properly inflated tire. It doesn't take much pressure to push the fluid through. A carburetor works because of the pressure differential of the 14ish p.s.i. of normal atmospheric pressure and the lower pressure at the discharge nozzles of the venturi. That difference can't be more than 5 or 6 p.s.i. but is sufficient to push fuel through the carb. :)
Thanks Ver.! I do recall, when the tire was inflated to it's max, the fluid squirted with vengeance! LOL. Good idea using some type of pressure control. Since I work alone a majority of the time, I've often thought about reviving that project. As you know you have to keep track of the fluid level, do you have some type of air bleeder, or, just be careful removing the cap?
 

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We used a pressure bleeder back in the 60's that ran off a spare tire aired to 10 lbs. It made bleeding brakes quick and easy for one person. You could attach your bleeder to either an air pig or to an old freon tank. Good job. and Good Luck.
 

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Thanks Ver.! I do recall, when the tire was inflated to it's max, the fluid squirted with vengeance! LOL. Good idea using some type of pressure control. Since I work alone a majority of the time, I've often thought about reviving that project. As you know you have to keep track of the fluid level, do you have some type of air bleeder, or, just be careful removing the cap?
Hi again. :) The 65/66 cars had a screw-on master cylinder cap, so I didn't really see any need for a pressure release valve. As you unscrew the cap, the residual pressure bleeds off slowly enough to not cause any problems. If I was making one of those for one of those new-fangled late model cars, like a 67, I would put a pressure release valve of some sort on it. Or, I could just disconnect the air hose on the other end from the master cylinder cap before I took the cap off. :)


We used a pressure bleeder back in the 60's that ran off a spare tire aired to 10 lbs. It made bleeding brakes quick and easy for one person. You could attach your bleeder to either an air pig or to an old freon tank. Good job. and Good Luck.
Thanks. :) I can't believe that there isn't something like this on the market already. :headscratch: I took me like all of 15 minutes to grab some junk and slap this thing together. Oh, well. Maybe someone start doing that. "A $99 value, yours, if you take advantage of this special offer, for only $49.99! But, wait! There's more! We will include this marvelous assortment of high tech vinyl tubing, guaranteed to fit any brake bleeder valve perfectly, a $19 value, absolutely free! And, if you call in the next 10 minutes, we will double tubing collection! And include this chrome/moly alloy multi-wrench, for 10mm, 5/16 and 3/8 bleeder valves absolutely free! Model-specific cap sold seperately. Shipping and handling not included." I just re-read that, and found myself reaching for the telephone. :gringreen
 

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:kooky::kooky::kooky:
 

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A great idea! Much better than what I've been doing, as outlined below.

I bought one of those hand operated vacuum pumps, but quickly found that it was almost useless to bleed the brakes. It just couldn't develop enough vacuum to pull the fluid through the lines.

But I did use the auto fill gadget I got at the same time to flush my '66 lines awhile back. You fill its tank with fluid and upend it over the MC. A one-way valve keeps the MC full as you drain fluid. I just hooked a clear piece of hose to the bleed valve on the wheel and stuck the other end in a jar with some brake fluid in it. Then I opened the valve and pumped the pedal until I didn't see any bubbles in the hose and closed the bleeder. I did this w/o any help, but it did require several trips back and forth to check. Of course there is no guarantee that this will get all the air out, but I did pump a lot of fluid to try and be sure. But I was really glad I did the flush; the stuff that came out looked pretty nasty.
 

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I bought one of those hand operated vacuum pumps, but quickly found that it was almost useless to bleed the brakes. It just couldn't develop enough vacuum to pull the fluid through the lines.
They develop enough vacuum but what happens is most of what you get is air leaking around the threads of the bleed screw instead of brake fluid coming out. I also found it useless for brake bleeding. The guys selling the vacuum pumps never tell you that detail for some reason. ;)

Pressure from the other end is a much better way to go about it.

Simple, easy solution if only I had a spare cap. :)
 
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