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1966 Mustang A-Code Coup, 289 V8 Automatic transmission
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all - I am a total Noob to the group, so please excuse any poor etiquite in my first few posts...

I picked up a father/son project yesterday. it is a 66 A-Code Coup with a 289 4BBL, California car. It had been sitting in a warehouse for 40 years, so it needs a little TLC, but generally in good shape. Runs and drives, so check that box! It does, however, hesitate on initial acceleration.

It has A/C, Power Steering, Automatic, and front disc brakes. The guy I bought it from put a new 4BBL QFT Slayer carb on it that has an electronic choke. While poking around, I found a wide open metal vacuum line (I think?) hanging around the carb area, and I am thinking it used to be attached to a vacuum operated choke? Or maybe some kind of CA emissions control function? I capped it off for now, and didnt notice any difference at idle, but I will take it out for a spin later to see if it helps with the hesitation issue.

Can anyone tell me for sure what ths open line is? Looks like it attaches to the crank case, so I have to assume vacuum line - right?
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1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
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Actually, that line is for the choke! It's the 'hot' line that goes to the choke housing. There's normally a 'cool' line that sucks filtered air from a fitting on the carb towards the back on the passenger side, underneath. Air goes down from that line to a 'choke stove' on the exhaust manifold, where it's heated, and then hot air comes up the other side and is sucked into the housing on the choke where the bi-metallic strip is. When it gets warm, the choke opens up.

Both of these lines are often rusty, damaged, or just missing. The system can work with only one line (the hot one) but at the choke stove on the manifold, it often gets crudded up with grease and dirt so the system doesn't work.

Edit: With your electric choke, you can remove it. It's not gonna do anything with your carb. =)

Welcome to AFM, Traviswright!
 

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Remove it, but don't throw it away. Parts are not cheap anymore let alone finding oem parts. Someone else may want to buy it or save if you decide to run oem carb later.
 

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1966 Mustang A-Code Coup, 289 V8 Automatic transmission
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You guys totally rock - thank you!.

BTW I am going to have a zillion questions as my 15 year old son and I work through his first car... We took it for a little test run today and found a leak in the gas tank fill coupling, and it started to overheat! IIt supposedly already has a new thermostat, so I am thinking the water pump is on the list of projects. Also need the water temperature gage to actually read temperature. :)

The list of fun is growing!

Travis
 

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07 Mustang GT
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Don't go throwing parts at problems, trouble shoot first. What temp is the engine getting to? Have you checked your timing as that can cause hesitation and higher temps. Test for vacuum leaks. Lean fuel conditions can also cause higher temps.
 

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That's a choke heat tube. It runs from a small chamber on the passenger exhaust manifold to the original choke, which drew heated air from it by way of an internal vacuum port.
 
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1966 Mustang A-Code Coup, 289 V8 Automatic transmission
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@07redstang - great advice about not throwing parts at the problem. After thinking more about this... The guy who I bought it from mentioned that he had just replaced the thermostat and the radiator cap. So clearly he had some kind of temp issue that he was throwing parts at... The cap is a 13 lb. When I say it was overheating, it was really just spitting coolant out of the overflow tube. Unfortunately, my temp and oil pressure gages are not working, so I am not clear on how hot it is actually getting.

Our first step is to flush the cooling system and fix the gages. I will see what I get and report back.
 

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Spitting coolant out the overflow could be as simple as the radiator being overfilled. There needs to be some head space for the fluid to expand.
100% correct. In the big block fords of the era a quart-sized pressurized overflow tank, set above the radiator, was used. The radiator gets completely filled and the small tank about a cup or so. This allowed a side-flow radiator, tanks on the sides, for a taller set of cooling fins.

In the small block and I6 engines and vertical flow radiator is used and the top of the radiator is its own overflow.
 
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Actually, that line is for the choke! It's the 'hot' line that goes to the choke housing. There's normally a 'cool' line that sucks filtered air from a fitting on the carb towards the back on the passenger side, underneath. Air goes down from that line to a 'choke stove' on the exhaust manifold, where it's heated, and then hot air comes up the other side and is sucked into the housing on the choke where the bi-metallic strip is. When it gets warm, the choke opens up.

Both of these lines are often rusty, damaged, or just missing. The system can work with only one line (the hot one) but at the choke stove on the manifold, it often gets crudded up with grease and dirt so the system doesn't work.

Edit: With your electric choke, you can remove it. It's not gonna do anything with your carb. =)

Welcome to AFM, Traviswright!
a factory Ford shop manual is a wonderful thing to have.All kinds of good info
 

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Hey all - I am a total Noob to the group, so please excuse any poor etiquite in my first few posts...

I picked up a father/son project yesterday. it is a 66 A-Code Coup with a 289 4BBL, California car. It had been sitting in a warehouse for 40 years, so it needs a little TLC, but generally in good shape. Runs and drives, so check that box! It does, however, hesitate on initial acceleration.

It has A/C, Power Steering, Automatic, and front disc brakes. The guy I bought it from put a new 4BBL QFT Slayer carb on it that has an electronic choke. While poking around, I found a wide open metal vacuum line (I think?) hanging around the carb area, and I am thinking it used to be attached to a vacuum operated choke? Or maybe some kind of CA emissions control function? I capped it off for now, and didnt notice any difference at idle, but I will take it out for a spin later to see if it helps with the hesitation issue.

Can anyone tell me for sure what ths open line is? Looks like it attaches to the crank case, so I have to assume vacuum line - right?
View attachment 782719 View attachment 782720 View attachment 782721 View attachment 782722
If it's the line you are holding it goes to the exhust manifold and screws onto the carb to the choke housing the non electric original choke and vacume from inside the card would suck up heat from the exhuest and open the choke there should also be another line that goes to the top of the carb where the air cleaner mounts that helps the carb suck in the warm air helping cold running. Hope that helps so if the carb has a port for that line either plug it up or instal a new choke stove into the manifold you may have to drill out the old tube because they rust off. If you don't want to do this put a cap on the carb because it would have a vacume leak.
 

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You guys totally rock - thank you!.

BTW I am going to have a zillion questions as my 15 year old son and I work through his first car... We took it for a little test run today and found a leak in the gas tank fill coupling, and it started to overheat! IIt supposedly already has a new thermostat, so I am thinking the water pump is on the list of projects. Also need the water temperature gage to actually read temperature. :)

The list of fun is growing!

Travis
Hi Travis, I highly recommend the Vintage Mustang Forum for questions specific to this era of Mustang. vintage-mustang.com. The folks there are tremendously knowledgeable about early Mustangs!
 

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Here’s a pic of the choke heat tube from a 65 289 which illustrates what many of you are explaining. Hang on to that part in case you ever decide to go back to an OEM set up. They are becoming extremely hard to find.
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1966 Mustang A-Code Coup, 289 V8 Automatic transmission
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you all so much for your help! I need to continue my discussion about the cooling system, but it does not seem to fit under this thread name, so I am going to start a new thread.
 
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