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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I am using the Granada front disc set up for my 67. I'm looking for a better pad and rotor combination. I'd like to keep the calipers. If you have had any experience with this please let me know what products you used and where you purchased them.
 

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From what I've found, Raybestos has some "Taxi Cab" pads. There's not a whole lot of performance pads out there for Granada brakes that I can find. As for rotors, there's not really a "performance" rotor, unless you want an aluminum hat. If anything, you'll want something thicker that can dissipate heat better, but a basic, plain-finish rotor is what you really need. Don't ever get drilled rotors, because they crack very easily. Slotted rotors are better than drilled, but only help if you drive in the wet, or do very hard, repeated stops that cook the pads. Otherwise, they hurt brake feel, make them too grabby, and introduce more cracking points.

So, if you have your heart set on Granada calipers, just get a set of good pads fromSummit, and some replacement rotors.
 

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With regards to brake linings in general,
Ceramics: They are good but do not develop any more friction than good quality OEM linings

Performance Friction & Hawk: Good braking, increased friction but very dirty compared to OEM.

Wagner & Raybestos: a line of products that is 100% marketing and mfg from very low quality/inexpensive and/or imported products with the mfg's not providing any back-up or support on product failures (and I mean real ugly spontaneous, catestropihic failures)

VelveTouch lining- Used for many decades and was the original lining used in all Shelby Mustangs in the 60’s (I personally have used the Velvetouch lining since 1960’s until brake lining production ceased in 1986), then switched to Carbo. Wellman has been the builder of braking linings for all of the Formula 1 race teams for more than 30 years and VT is now available again.

Bendix- TitaniuMetallic™ II, a newer lining (semi-metallic) and although I have not personally used this, I have always been impressed with Bendix brake linings and this particular lining IIMHO would be a low dust, excellent oem upgrade/mild performance type brake lining.

CarboTech Engineering lining, which I have used for about 20+ years and been very happy on multiple full size (V8) cars and trucks. This particular lining has a high friction co-efficient, excellent pedal feel, wears (typically 50,000 to 75,000 miles before replacement is required) and produces less dust than OEM linings.

I highly recommend speaking to them by phone for linings that would be best for your application. Fyi- braking co-efficient is what identifies the bite rating of the linings- you want the CE to be no less than that of the OEM.....this will drive most e-base distributors & big box store "experts" right out of their mind because they either cannot verify this info or you will find the spec is less than oem. IMHO, i would look for a CE that is .49 or greater.

With regards to rotors, I use OEM replacement rotors that are cryogenically treated at Diversified Cryogenics, making them almost as hard as stainless steel. Unfortunately, almost everyone (Brembo, Powerslot, Raybestos, Bendix, Hawk etc.) are all purchasing their rotors from the same foundary in China (with the exception of the $300 each composite high end units for Ferrari, Porsche, etc).

DC purchases the highest grade rotors made, laser mic them for quality, scrap the ones that are out of spec and cryogenically treat the good ones which are now as strong as stainless. They will also slot and cross drill the rotors for you. DC's service, price and quality are excellent as well.

For street use, slotted/drilled rotors are just “cheese-graters” for the brake pads IMHO, because unless you are involved in true racing conditions, the brake linings do not produce the gases which slotted/drilled rotors are designed to relive. In some cases, brake testing indicated reduce brake efficiency in street-based operations using slotted/drilled rotors when equal comparisons were made. I am very satisfied with the performance & wear of these products.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Paul and Beechkid, thanks for the input. I should add some more detail. I recently took my car to my local track (Mosport) and caught the bug. I'd like to track the car occasionally.

My internet search has lead me to Porterfield RS-4 compound or ECB yellow-stuff. Rotors are another story.

Paul289 I know you auto cross yours. What kind of brakes do you use?
 

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I'm using the Kelsey Hayes style discs in front from SSBC with Hawk HP Plus pads, although the caliper is cast iron and super heavy. I'd like to upgrade to a six-piston Wilwood setup to match the rears which are Wilwood Dynapro calipers on 12.19" rotors with Polymatrix E pads. Both the HP Plus and PM E pads are street/track pads, and shouldn't fade much at higher temps. If you have the stock spindles still, I'd put on this kit if you're on a budget, or this 6-piston kit if you really want some good braking with 15" wheels. Get the largest diameter rotor you can fit inside your wheel, and the thickest, as well. A thicker rotor means much better heat dissipation, and less brake fade. Autocrossing isn't too stressful on brakes, but road racing puts a huge load on them. The Granada calipers might be just fine, but I imagine that most other calipers will be better, and there's better pad selection for most other calipers.

I've heard that the Yellow-stuff pads are pretty good, but I'd tend more towards Hawk HP Plus, personally. It's a good dual-purpose pad, and it's worked well for me on high-speed stops.
 

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Another note, I would also highly recommend that you check your bearings after an open track day, or at least repack the bearings with some high temp grease. I cooked the grease in my bearings after a few very hard, high-speed stops.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK I didn't even think about the bearing grease. Is that an ordeal or something very simple that my mechanic can do while changing brake pads at minimal cost?
 

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It's pretty easy to do, but it can take a while. If you want to do it yourself, the process is straightforward. Clean all the old grease out of the bearings with either carb cleaner or brake cleaner first. Put a blob of new grease in your hand, then press the bottom edge of the bearing into it until the grease comes out around the rollers. The hardest part is getting the bearings in and out. Take a nut off the spindle, then pull the rotor/hub unit off. The outer bearing might fall off, so be careful about it. The larger inner bearing will be held in by a seal. With the rotor flat on the ground and the wheel studs pointing up, put the largest deep socket you can fit into the center and gently tap it out with a hammer. To reinstall, put the big bearing back in, then put the seal back in place on top of it and tap it in gently. Put the rotor back on the spindle and reinstall the outer bearing with the washer on top of it. Put the nut back on the spindle. Now for the kinda tricky part. While spinning the rotor, slowly tighten the nut until the rotor stops spinning freely. Back the nut off to the next slot for the cotter pin. Replace cotter pin, then install dust cap.

It took me about an hour to do both sides, from removing the caliper to putting it back on, which most shops would charge $50-70 for. Naturally, a mechanic that does this for a living could do it faster than me. They would also have bearing packers, so it might not take much longer than actually changing pads and rotors, especially since Ford liked to make the hub and rotor one unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've asked my local performance shop to locate some Hawk HP plus pads. However I've read that they are noisey. Are they noisey on yoiur car?
 

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They do squeal a bit. Not very loudly; it's not shrill or ear piercing, but it is noticeable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
They do squeal a bit. Not very loudly; it's not shrill or ear piercing, but it is noticeable.
Thanks again for all the info. Do you use any special type of brake fluid? And do you use any special type of bearing grease? Does it have to have Moly in it?
 

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If you plan on doing serious track days and have slicks or you do high speed stops, then yes, you will need high-temp brake fluid. But if you only plan on going out for a few laps at a time, then probably not. You can run once or twice and check your fluid to see if you need to upgrade. If it turns brown, then yeah, you need high temp fluid. Wilwood makes a good one, although it is fairly expensive. Most high-temp greases will work, and yes, it does need Moly. Any auto parts store will carry it. I'd also go with a name brand.
 

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Hi. I am using the Granada front disc set up for my 67. I'm looking for a better pad and rotor combination. I'd like to keep the calipers. If you have had any experience with this please let me know what products you used and where you purchased them.

Are you using actual Granada Spindles or would it be the CSRP Granada swap spindles ?
 
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