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Hello to all,
My brother just purchased a 1966 Mustang in fair shape that he and I will hopefully restore within four years for his son, who is 12 now and this will be his car when he becomes 16.
My brother wants this project to be something that will allow he and his son to work on a project that will be very meaningful to both of them.

It is our intent to do a full restoration meaning that we want to take every nut and bolt and wire off the car, repair the rust, and repair, repaint and replace as much as possible as affordable as possible.

This car will be a daily driver, but it will not be 100-percent original parts, as we may improve brakes and add new stereo components, etc., but we want it to be as original looking as possible.

Basically, this is my first post to say hello. If there is anything you should tell us up front that will help our project, it would be appreciated. My brother has purchased the "How to Restore a Mustang" book that seems to be very popular, but we would appreciate any other direction.

Also, my brother and I are very mechanically inclined and have many friends that are mechanics, body shop men, etc., so we are not going into this blind or without personal skills.

Thanks,

Dan of Troy
(No relation to Helen)
 

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Me and my father purchased a 64.5 mustang for my highschool graduation present, and I've done 70% of the work myself, and I must say I havent really bonded with my dad as much as we have working and talking about our mustangs.

Its a gigantic project, and a big point we got to was, dont fix it if it isnt broken, aslong as the rust is not a serious decay, clear the crud with wire brushing and slop plenty of rustoleum paint on it, taking a whole car apart is a expensive and big pain in the ass.

My car is a daily driver, replaced the needed parts greased everything up got it running good and fix issues together as they come up, took about 4 months of weekend working on my car to get it streetable like it is now, and we still continue to work out bugs, but use asmuch of what you already have is my advice, cause its not cheap once you start taking things apart.

and paying for full brake or addon upgrades.
 

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I agree with Instinx about if it aint' broke...

I restored a 65 coupe with my son and we had a great experience. Created memories that will last forever.

We started with a solid (no rust) car that had decent paint, but needed some mechanical work and a new interior. That's about as far as I would recommend your brother goes..especially with a 12 year old. Having mechanics in your circle of friends/family will help, but there are simply too many things someone that young shouldn't do on a car (my opinion anyway). You and your bro will end up doing those things yourselves and his son will get bored watching you. Take it from experience.

A frame-off, nut/bolt resto is a huge job. And right now you don't know if the boy (or you!) will have the interest and stamina to tackle such a long term project.

My advice?

Get a car that runs and needs just a little work. See how he takes to it. If you finish the car and he still wants more, sell the project and get another one that needs more work.

The other thing to consider is safety... I'm not sure I'd want my 16 year old son with a new driver's license to use a restored mustang as a daily driver. No airbags, no 3 point seat belts, a gas tank that's separated from the passenger compartment by a piece of cardboard, etc.

Restoring a car is a great idea that will create lasting memories...but I suggest using it for memory creation and not transportation. He'll get just as much joy out of it just going to cruises/shows and to get ice cream on a summer night with his Dad. Maybe once in a while on a date ;).

Just my .02 cents.... enjoy!
 

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Cuddy's comments were also the first thing that came to my mind too when I read about a 16 year old's first car.

Like he stated, the Mustang is a simple car and lacks many of the safety features in today's cars (ok, it lacks basically ALL the safety features in today' cars). I'll be nervous driving mine at first because I know how potentially dangerous it can be if I were to get in a wreck. So just something to be aware of with a new, inexperienced driver, especially when they are more prone to accidents.

Secondly, put a hot car in a 16 year old's hands as their own and I promise you they are going to drive it like it's stolen! Not only does that exponentially increase their chance of getting in an accident, but it probably says you don't want to make it TOO nice! :bigthumbsup
 

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I agree that a classic mustang is alot less safe then a modern car, but my first car and forever is my 65. I spin a wheel for giggles sometimes but after getting a job with blood and sweat on days off getting the car ready and road worthy I can see the difference myself in how I drive and "baby" my own car as, opposed to strolling in my parents 2009 fusion that I cared nothing for and got alil too wreckless at some points.

The point is to make the car worth it, and valued to the owner, not just some beater first car to test there limits with.

basic example from my own experience recently.

Drove to my fathers house to work on car, speed limit 30 on a 5 mile road surrounded by trees and hard curves, average speed in 2009 fusion 45-50 mph.

Alone in 65 mustang driving around the same road, average speed 25-30.

Something about just cruising no matter the speed makes me smile about my 65, and I take care of it and respect it, cause every part of that car I've paid for.
 

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I agree with everyones comments. Keeping a teenager focused on a project that seems to them like it will never be finished is VERY difficult. We spent 2 1/2 years on our Father Son working on it every weekend and a few nights during the week.

Do the CSRP disk swap for safety.

Fix rust and repair what is needed first. Develop a plan and a time line and post it on the wall in the garage. Mark of things as you finish them. It is a great visual motivator for a teenager.

Here is the Factory Service manual for the 66:
Scribd

Make sure you get a commitment from everyone that you want to do it and you have resources and a skill set to finish it. It is sad to see projects on Craigslist that people have given up on. Just trying to make sure you go in with eyes wide open.

With all that said... Our 66 was and is an incredible bonding experience between my son and I. He knows more about cars than all of his friends now. I am thankful for the extra time we had together when most of his friends did not want to be around their parents.

Take a look a my website for ideas and information.
Christophers 66 Mustang Restoration and Modification

Be sure to ask questions here. We are a great community of Mustang lovers and people who have experience with what you are going to do...

Good Luck and BE Safe
Ron
 

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Hello danoftroy,
I too agree with many of my great friends on this topic.

I will not harp on the debate of weather a classic is the right car to
start driving with. I do know every young boy is different.
Some are more mature than others and some will loose interest as
soon as the girls start coming around LOL

I do want to offer a few tips adnb ideas.

1. - Join a Mustang Club or group of people in your area that enjoy cars.
Up here is Mass there are cruise nights every night of the week. You get to meet a lot of people and they will share ideas and info. Great father and son events to go to

2. - Look up places like Mustangs Unlimited, CJ Pony Parts, Dallas Mustang and so many others to request free catalogs.

3. - Get familliar with your local Advance Auto or Auto Zone. They usually have at least one real smart mechanic who will help you. I mean no disrespect to other workers but there is usually one that knows a lot. Besides it is good to try to keep some of the $$$$ local.

4. - Check out "RockAuto .com - -I use them a lot.

5. - When teaching this young man - - ALWAYS - -stress SAFETY. And please show him by example. Get goggles, jack stands etc. It does no good to just talk the talk - -you gotta teach him at an early age how serious SAFETY issues are when working.
Use tools for the proper purpose and don't skimp.

6. - Try to explain to the young man what function parts have in the workings of a car.

7. - See if you can get a small model of the car and let him assemble it.


Working on a father son project is PRICELESS. Keep in mind - -there will be times when school and life draw him away from the project - -BUt he will come back to it.

Talk to him - -make a plan for how you guys will go about the project.
Perhaps you want to get it running mechanically first
Then move to steering and brakes etc etc.

Let him know - -this project will require dedication and some good old fashioned elbow greese.

I wish you a LOT of fun on this project and perhaps show him how to use this forum so he can ask questions as well.

MY best wishes and stick with this forum - -there are loads of GREAT people and repsonders

Print Dad - -" end of sermon":yup:
 

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My first car was a 65 impala it was a pile of rust but keep me out of trouble.As i got older i liked newer cars had a few imports then went back to older cars.
 
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