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For some time, my 93 GT was leaking oil where the transmission meets the oil pan. Smoke (oil) would blow up through the center console where the stick shift is, when i floor the gas pedal or when the engine is under load.

I recently got around to addressing this issue and made an appointment with my mechanic to get the oil pan gasket and/or rear seal replaced.

A few days prior to my appointment, i decided to flush the radiator and pour in some fresh coolant.

Since then, my Mustang no longer blows smoke and it appears that i no longer have an oil leak! The oil pan is just little moist but nowhere near enough to leak oil. Thinking that the (blown?) oil pan gasket or rear seal shifted in a way to seal the leak, I did a number of WOT runs and smoke no longer blows up through the center console.

What might have happened?
 

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It could be that you were leaking trans fluid, not motor oil.

I had the exact same thing happen to me, on 2 different T5s. I would get a lot of smoke after running the car under a heavy load.

Then one day the smoke stopped (because the trans was dry). Over the next month or so, the trans started making more and more noise, until one day it blew.

The T5s usually leak due to a worn output shaft bushing. When you accelerate, all the fluid sloshes to the rear and leaks out there. Centrifuge flings it off the driveshaft, where it then splatters on the exhaust and burns off.

Check the fluid level on your trans ASAP, and if it's way low or dry, replace the bushing (and the driveshaft yoke).

When it started on my second T5, I got by topping mine off every month or so until I got the will to drop the trans and fix it, but letting it go for too long is a gamble IMO.

Replacing the bushing is a PITA, but can be done at home. You need to pull the tailhousing off the trans (done more easily with the trans out of the car, but I hear you can do it in the car). I just stood the tailhousing on end, lined up the new bushing over the old one, and used the new one to drive the old one out with a hammer, using a block of wood cut from a 2x2 as a buffer between the hammer and the new bushing to avoid damaging it.

D&D has new bushings and yokes.
 
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