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Discussion Starter #1
I'm gonna remove the USELESS rear seats and build panels to replace them!!:wink:
When I removed the rear seats today I found what appears to be a BIG BOLT that looks important!!:surprise:
What is it and how to work around it???
 

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You don't. That's your upper control arm mount bolt. 350 lbs/ft torqued on there, with locktight.
 

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Its the upper control arm bracket mount.

GO ahead and remove it, it doesn't do anything important......

But seriously, yeah don't remove it. You would have a helluva time removing it if you actually tried.
 

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Impact takes 2 seconds to remove the bolt. At least now you know where to start if you replace the upper control arm with a better one.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmmmm.....looks like it will be covered somehow!!:|
I think the ones sold by AM have a ridge in the middle to work around the bolt!!confused013.gif
 

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Clack circles

I'm gonna remove the USELESS rear seats and build panels to replace them!!
Black circles.jpg

What are the black circles that are under the seat and to the left and right of the big bolt in the center?
 

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Fuel pump and fuel tank access panels
 

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Big access panels.

Fuel pump and fuel tank access panels
Thanks. I looked up a couple of pictures of a 2014 Mustang fuel pump and they show why the access panel is so big:


Fuel Pump.jpg

Fuel pump 2.jpg

I am going have see what the fuel pump looks like from the underside of my car. The bottom of the car is not very high off the ground. I am puzzled as to how this fuel pump sticks through the floor under the back seat. It seem like it would not have very much clearance from what is below the car. I confess to being behind the times. I am used to the fuel pump being under the hood.

Airtex Fuel Pump.jpg
 

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I am going have see what the fuel pump looks like from the underside of my car. The bottom of the car is not very high off the ground. I am puzzled as to how this fuel pump sticks through the floor under the back seat. It seem like it would not have very much clearance from what is below the car.
I haven't looked but more than likely the pump is in the tank. This is pretty common among most makes and models.
 

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It is. One panel accesses the pump and one the level sender.

Fuel pump changes are unnecessary on this car, in most cases. The pump voltage is regulated by the ECM and capped at 54 psi because the system is returnless. If this makes no sense, time to upgrade the knowledge base on what modern cars are capable of. :grin:
 

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Gas tank access.

One panel accesses the pump and one the level sender.
It seems to be a bit hazardous to have two big access ports to the gas tank inside the car.

Falcons and early Mustangs (1965 - 1970) used the top of the gas tank as the floor of the trunk. The only thing that separated the trunk from the car's interior was the back seat. If the tank ruptured in a rear end collision, gasoline was inside the car. See: Mustang: A Classic Danger? - CBS News

After the problem of Pintos catching fire, Ford started suspending the gas tank underneath the bottom of the car with straps. That put the gas tank outside the car and placed a continuous steel floor between the gas tank and the car's interior.

Now Ford has put gas tank access panels inside the car under the back seat. It seems like a step backwards.
 

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If that gas tank gets ruptured, you're probably already dead, because the cabin of the car has been crushed.

Regarding the Pinto, from an article in Popular Mechanics (via Google), "Upon impact, the filler neck would tear away from the sheet-metal tank and spill fuel beneath the car. The tank was also easily punctured by bolts protruding from the differential and nearby brackets"
 

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1977 Pinto

After the problem of Pintos catching fire, Ford started suspending the gas tank underneath the bottom of the car with straps.
I guess that I was wrong regarding my statement about Pinto gas tanks. They used the "safe" method of being suspended under the car by straps. Here is a picture of the gas tank on a 1977 Pinto wagon:

1977 Pinto Wagon.jpg

That did not help much when, as Freewayflyer referenced,: "Upon impact, the filler neck would tear away from the sheet-metal tank and spill fuel beneath the car. The tank was also easily punctured by bolts protruding from the differential and nearby brackets"
 

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I guess that I was wrong regarding my statement about Pinto gas tanks. They used the "safe" method of being suspended under the car by straps. Here is a picture of the gas tank on a 1977 Pinto wagon:

View attachment 510490

That did not help much when, as Freewayflyer referenced,: "Upon impact, the filler neck would tear away from the sheet-metal tank and spill fuel beneath the car. The tank was also easily punctured by bolts protruding from the differential and nearby brackets"

So like every fox body mustang ever made...
 

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It seems to be a bit hazardous to have two big access ports to the gas tank inside the car.

Falcons and probably early Mustangs used the top of the gas tank as the floor of the trunk. The only thing that separated the trunk from the car's interior was the back seat. If the tank ruptured in a rear end collision, gasoline was inside the car.

After the problem of Pintos catching fire, Ford started suspending the gas tank underneath the bottom of the car with straps. That put the gas tank outside the car and placed a continuous steel floor between the gas tank and the car's interior.

Now Ford has put gas tank access panels inside the car under the back seat. It seems like a step backwards.
Holy ****, Rip Van Winkle, where ya been for the last 40+ years?

You want to talk safety in this car? I walked out, yes, walked out of this rollover with two cracked ribs.

The tank in this car is ABS plastic and placed in the strongest part of the floor pan, with the axle on one side and trans and engine on the other and steel panels around it. It's as well fortified as any part on the car. Those access ports are just that, access to the sealed and lock ringed parts beneath them, If gas was to try to get inside that way, the entire passenger tub would have to be crushed like a beer can.
 

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It seems to be a bit hazardous to have two big access ports to the gas tank inside the car.
They aren't actually in the car. The access covers are under the car. There is just a removable boot under the rear seat. This is quite common as well.
 

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Gas Tanks

They aren't actually in the car. The access covers are under the car. There is just a removable boot under the rear seat. This is quite common as well.
Hell. Blazin72.

Thanks. That explains things better.


Holy ****, Rip Van Winkle, where ya been for the last 40+ years?
I have always had older used "practical" cars and acted rather out of character when I bought a new 2016 Mustang GT. This car is quite a bit different than any car that I have had previously (to put it mildly).

It has, for example, "coil on plug ignition". I looked that up to see what it was and found that the car has no spark plug wires. Wow! Then I read that "this has been common since the 1990's." Wow!

I really need a Haynes or Chiltons service manual for this car, but no one seems to have published one yet .

You want to talk safety in this car? I walked out, yes, walked out of this rollover with two cracked ribs.
Whew! You right door really hit something hard. I am glad that you were not seriously injured.

The tank in this car is ABS plastic and placed in the strongest part of the floor pan, with the axle on one side and trans and engine on the other and steel panels around it. It's as well fortified as any part on the car. Those access ports are just that, access to the sealed and lock ringed parts beneath them, If gas was to try to get inside that way, the entire passenger tub would have to be crushed like a beer can.

That all sounds good. I need to read more about the "ABS plastic" gas tanks, though. When did the industry switch from steel gas tanks to plastic? Plastic would be better than steel in regards to corrosion. I need to look up the melting temperature of ABS plastic.

That was an issue which caused this recall: "The second recall is for the 2015 Ford Mustang with a 2.3 liter engine. If the underbody is too hot for too long, the fuel tank and vapor lines can degrade which could result in a fuel leak and cause a fire." See: Ford recalls 442,500 vehicles for fuel tank, steering problems
 

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Well, with any mass produced object, there can be problems...witness GM's attempt to deflect blame for actual deaths due to their ignition switch issues over the last couple years. This is especially true of new cars and why I won't buy an introductory year. Even Ferrari encounters problems.

No one has been killed by burning Ecoboosts, I don't think. Manufacturers need to stay ahead of potential problems and the experience of big-scope recalls these days (which would have been ignored by manufacturers in the past, until death) show manufacturers that it's cheaper to deal with the issue than lose market share. Plastic tanks are not universal in automotive and motorcycle use but they are common. Stronger penetration resistance, lighter, rust free for life.

The biggest issue with the 11-14 has been that it is caught up in the Takata airbag recall and supply of the replacement bags is delayed.

The S197 passes all crash tests with flying colours. The new S550 is even better.
 

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Plastic

Plastic tanks are not universal in automotive and motorcycle use but they are common. Stronger penetration resistance, lighter, rust free for life.
Interesting. I found a site that says: "an average plastic tank weighs two-thirds less than an average steel tank." It also says that plastic gas tanks can be molded into any shape, are less expensive to produce, and corrosion free. See: Light-Weight Fuel Tanks | European Plastic Automotive Fuel Systems

One thing I do not buy is: "When a plastic fuel tank is exposed to fire, it is more likely to melt or decompose and allow the contents to flow out and add fuel to the fire. That reduces the risk of explosion and enhances the safety of the car."

A steel gas tank is not likely to explode because it is vented and is not a sealed can.

See: "Cars Just Don't Explode" : Cars just dont explode | Automotive Thinker - Discussing the finer points of automobiles
 
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