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i have a little 200 in my car but i was tired of not having any power so a uncle of mine gave me a 289 of his that him and his dad rebuilt. but the engine was too big for the car they had. so it sat covered with cloth and covered with tarp never been used. so me and my dad are planning to put the bigger engine in my car but i thought would i have to replace some bearings, fule pump, water pump. or would i even have to completely rebuild the whole engine again? please tell me everything i would have to to to get it running again.
 

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When assembled, a new or rebuilt motor should have some special lube on the bearings and cam to prevent initial wear during the first start-up. Unless you get everything right the first time engine might have to be cranked a lot to get it running, so that lube gives you a bit of insurance. After 20 years that lube might have gummed up or drained to the bottom of the oil pan.

Since the engine is just sitting there it wouldn't be a big deal to partially disassemble and re-lube those parts just to make sure.
 

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You could put oil in and circulate the oil thru the engine with a drill(priming the oil pump) with a mechanical oil pressure gauge you should see the oil pressure come up. Removing the valve covers to watch for oil reaching the valve train would be a good idea. Maybe a teaspoon of Marvel Mystery oil in the cylinders to loosen any rings that may be sticking. Then, rotate crank by hand to make sure everthing is free. I recently fired up a similar engine. Everything under the valve covers was still pristine and pulled the oil pan with same result. As long as all openings were sealed where critters didn't crawl inside, it should be good. Good luck.
 

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Bare minimum - disassemble to the short block and inspect for any signs of internal surface rust especially in the cylinders. I would even pull the crank and rod caps to inspect and re-lube the bearings. Any sign of corrosion on the rotating assembly contact/bearing surfaces would require futher dissassembly and bearing replacement, cylinder honing, and/or journal polishing. Same goes for the heads, around the valves and springs. Of course, any internal rust should be cleaned off to prevent it from dislodging and turning you oil into a gritty engine killer.
 
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