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I have to replace my passenger side upper control arm on my 1970 mustang grande. I was hoping someone could instruct me in a step by step procedure on how to do this. Im not very familiar with front end work. Thanks
 

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I replaced the ones on my '67 a couple of years back. If I recall correctly, first I supported the front end at the lower control arm, removed the wheel then the shock, compressed the coil spring (read more about this further on) and took it out, leaving me with easy access to the Upper Control Arm nuts that fasten it to the inner fender well. Me thinks there were two nuts, about ¾". Remove these then slide out the UCA and replace it. Should be the same on a '70 as '67. Just make sure when you compress the spring you excercise caution. The springs can release like a grenade going off. I have a set of CTA Mfg. spring compressors. Some rental yards carry them. The compressor goes through the inside of the spring and the top and bottom has two grabbing hooks. Make sure they're evenly spaced when compressing the spring. You'll want the weight of the car resting on the lower control arm so as to keep the spring compressed with help from the weight of the car itself. That makes compressing the spring easier...less travel to deal with. Good luck and don't blow yourself up!
 

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Let me start by saying I have a 67 Coupe...so not exactly the same car, but the procedure will be almost the same because the front suspension is still relatively similar. This procedure is relatively straightforward and simple. You will need a coil spring compressor, preferrably the kind with the two swinging hooks on the top and bottom and the compressor fits inside the coil spring. You can loan these for free at most national auto parts stores.

You need to place jack stands under the car on the torque boxes (the area of the subframe JUST before it curves up into the engine bay) Remove the tire.

1. First remove the two bolts bolting the top of the shock to the shock tower caps. Don't worry, nothing will pop out at you.

2. Remove the three nuts holding the shock tower caps to the top of the shock tower. Again, nothing will pop out at you.

3. Remove the two bolts at the bottom of the shock absorber bolting it to the coil spring perch. An socket on an extension is best for this.

4. You can now pull the shock straight out through the top.

5. Place a coil spring compressor down through the center of the coil spring and hook the hooks at the top and bottom through the springs. The compressor is tightened by tightening a nut at the top with a socket wrench. Compress it far enough until you can pull it out. Be EXTREMELY careful here and handle it like it is a live bomb, because it is. Do not drop it. When compressed it is under extreme pressure. Set it down very carefully and make sure it doesn't get bumped.

6. Now the upper ball joint has a stud on the bottom that goes through the top of the spindle. Remove the cotter pin that goes through the ball joint stud and then unscrew the castelated nut.

7. The upper control arm is now no longer attached to any of the suspension. The UCA is attached to the shock towers by two studs accessible on the engine bay side. Unscrew the two nuts on the shock tower on the engine bay side and the UCA can now be removed.

--Remove the spring perch by removing the two nuts on the underside of the UCA.

8. The installation is where it gets a little tricky. The UCA shaft needs to be perfectly centered in the control arm. For me this is best accomplished by completely loosening the bushings (giant nuts on each end) and tightening them uniformly turn by turn so each bushing is tightened by the same number of threads. This will center the shaft. It may take a few tries. Measure the distance from the bushing to the shaft stud to make sure there is equal distance on both sides.

9. Install 90 degree angled grease zerks in the ends of the shaft bushings. Don't crank them in too tight, you'll have to further tighten them once the arm is installed so you can point them straight out to get access to grease. Now would be a good time to fill them with grease.

10. Installation is opposite of removal. I'd suggest getting new spring insulators that go on top of the spring up inside the shock tower. Again be extremely careful when installing the spring.


I don't have torque specs off hand, but someone here will.
 
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