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As I am replacing my 67 suspension I have decided to paint the underside and chasis. It is not a show car so it does not have to be original or perfect. I live in the south east and the car has no rust. I would like to damped sound and heat, but undercoat looks so messy, and my opinion unattractive. I am considering using high temp (250 degrees) VHT satin black self priming all weather rust and salt resistant paint. Any reason not to use this product? Any other ideas/products? Any strong reasons to go with a ruberrized undercoat?

Should I put seam sealer in the inside and outside of the floor pan seams, around the gas tank, etc., or just the inside?

Thanks,

Camben
 

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Regarding the seam sealer, I have the factory weld and seam sealer manual, and it was only originally placed on the inside floor pan seams, but putting it on the outside certainly won't hurt anything and will only help.

The pros and cons to using an epoxy such as the one you're describing is it will seal out water and the elements pretty well, but may be more susceptible to chipping off. If it forms rock hard like Miracle Paint and POR do, then you're probably ok.

The pros and cons to rubberized undercoating is it is more absorbant and repelling to things that chip like rocks and road debris, but does not seal out water, and it can be real messy when you want to remove it.

So the best scenario would be to put a rubberized undercoating over the epoxy if it states you can do that.

Since you asked for suggestions for other projects, I'd strongly recommend Bill Hirsch Miracle Paint. I'm using it on my own restoration, it looks super sharp (it actually looks and feels like black glass when it's dried), dries tough as nails, permanently stops/prevents rust, and is impenetrable by road salt and most chemicals. That would be a stand-alone product that you could spray or brush on and never have to worry about again. I am using it to paint/protect any place prone to rusting, moisture, or just general abuse. All my floor pans inside and underneath got a healthy two coats, as well as my frame rails.
 

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Personally, I like the undercoating, it lasts forever and really helps with road noises. The seam sealer cannot hurt anywhere unless you are building a show car where they look for correct location which was inadequate from the factory.
 

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This is the stuff I used on my car and it has been on there since I bought the car back in 1996. It has held up very well. I gave it a second application after 10 years.

http://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/specialized_maintenance_repair/body_interior_trim/auto_Permatex_Undercoating.htm

They have a Rubberized version, but I did not use that one.

http://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/specialized_maintenance_repair/body_interior_trim/auto_Permatex_Heavy_Duty_Rubberized_Undercoating.htm
 

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I have a 66 fastback that I'm restoring and this car sat for over 30 years in 3' high water at times. The inner wheel wells had I believe the rubber undercoating, (textured finish) sprayed on before that time. I'm now removing it to clean up that area, I'm super amazed how stong that stuff is and how well it lasted. I have been using a hard edge puddy knife to scrape it off and etc. It does come off with some real elbow grease. Under this rubber undercoating is a well preserved with a like new paint job from the factory on those inner wheel wells. That stuff really preserved those wheel wells. I bought some yesterday and I will be spraying back on again.

Greg
 

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Greg, I found a good way to remove the old undercoating last fall. The temps got down to the mid 40s and I used an impact hammer set on a low pressure setting. I little higher than what it took to make the hammer work. I used a wide bit and started chiseling the undercoating off. My undercoating was very old and the cold temps really helped make it brittle. It beat anything else I tried!
 

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To remove the undercoating, warm it up, use a hair dryer, paint remover gun that is like a hair dryer, then it comes off easy with a putty knife.
 

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I do not know enough on the paint but can say if you are looking for a driver and not a show car then undercoating looking a bit ugly should not be an issue. I will say that if you do go with the undercoating make certain everything is primed first.
 
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