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So, this doesn't pertain to my Mustang, but my parents' Navigator. Long story short I had their car when the power lift gate quit working. Take it in with both sets of keys and fobs, get it back with one key and fob. I refused to leave the shop that day without both keys but the service advisor swears he looked everywhere, still can't find it.

So he goes into the parts dept. and has them pull down a new key. Not once do I see a new key getting cut. He then re-programs both keys and says I'm good to go. :what: Umm..did I miss something are all the Navigator's for a certain year keyed the same and the technology is good enough that even the car door won't open without the programmed key, or can I just walk up to Joe Blow's car that is the same year as mine and open up his door.

If someone could help me understand this a little I would appreciate it A LOT! As it stands my dad wants it rekeyed in and out at the dealerships expense, unless the technology goes as far as not opening the car door without the properly programmed key.

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ETA- I asked on here as the keys for the Mustang and the Navigator seem very similar with the exception of the key fob.
 

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I'd sure want everything re-keyed, and the control computer reprogrammed for a new key sequence, assuming it has the same kind of sensor the stangs have. Think about it this way- the best theft protection is the sensor chip in that key. Without a key programmed to THAT specific vehicle, it won't start. Now, there is a key floating around programmed for your specific truck, in a building that hasw access to your home address. How hard is it now to find and steal that nav? Ever seen Gone in 60 seconds? The "unstealable" mercedes? Somebody pays an insider (your service guy, for instance) to provide a key and an address. Poof. Car is gone.


I'm not saying the service guys are crooks for sure, but I'd be nervous as hell...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ultraclyde said:
I'm not saying the service guys are crooks for sure, but I'd be nervous as hell...
Oh, I'll say it. I now don't trust them as far as I can throw them. I've never liked them, and this was just icing on that cake.

Really though, as far as address matching registration, it doesn't. Bought through a company, but resides at a home address, which they don't have. I dunno, I would like to think it was an honest mistake, but given prior history with these idiots...it's hard to say.

Dad called the dealership he bought it from and informed them of what had happened. They told him exactly what you said, get it re-keyed. Then they also told him what the ballpark cost should be, so the dealership here can't play that game with us. I guess now we just get to wait for the service manager to magically get back in town and see what he has to say.
 

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They used a key code

I had a similar thing happened to me. I later asked the auto locksmith company Car Keys Atlanta, and they told me Ford authorizes certified locksmiths to look up the code on a system and they can cut your keys without even touching the car. Then they just need to program them with the car which usually takes less than 15 minutes.
 

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I had a similar thing happened to me. I later asked the auto locksmith company Car Keys Atlanta, and they told me Ford authorizes certified locksmiths to look up the code on a system and they can cut your keys without even touching the car. Then they just need to program them with the car which usually takes less than 15 minutes.
True. When the car was purchased new, there is a small bar code tag attached to the new car keys that you should keep in a safe place. That tag allows certified locksmiths to know how the cuts are to be made to the keys and the associated codes. Your dealer never has to physically see the keys to be able to cut and code keys for your parents Navigator. All he has to do is look into his computer for your dads vehicle info.
 

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If you cut a new key and introduce it to the computer along with the existing key, the key's embedded chips will now allow the car to start. Cutting a key from the cut-code will open the door but won't start the car. You must have a "good key" in order to introduce additional keys. So there's no danger of someone duplicating a key and driving off in your Lincoln. This happens too often at shops, and it's a pain in the ass for everyone. But changing locks is not an option. Plus in a few days the tech will find the key and return it to you. Then you'll have three keys!
 
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