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Years ago a friend of mine used to put bags of sand in the trunk of his '87 GT when winter came. He claimed it helped his car maintain traction in the snow. Does anyone living in snowy climates still do that when winter comes? I'll be using my '14 GT year round so I'll be adding 4 snow tires, but I'm wondering what else people do to help in the snow.
TIA for any advice.
 

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I went all last winter without.
I figured I'd try without and see if I ever was in a situation where they would be a help and everything went fine so I never bothered getting any.
 

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I've been driving my Mustangs every winter since 2010. With four winter tires I've never needed any extra weight in the trunk. I've been in some pretty hairy situations, but managed without it.
 

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2005 4.0L V6, 5 spd manual.
Just snows on the rear.
Have driven 4 winters in southern CT AOK.






l
 

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I grew up in upstate NY and we all used to keep some bags of sand in our trunks during the winter. Of course you still have to take it easy but i felt like it always helped and if you or anyone else should happen to get stuck you can just rip one open and use the sand to get some extra traction. I think i used to keep anywhere between 80-100lbs of it back there
 

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Two winters with my old 2011 and one with the 2014 and I never put anything in the trunk. Just make sure you have all season tires. In the winter I use my stock 17" wheels with the factory tires. Just so you know the stock 18" all season Pirelli tire are only good for lite snow anything more then a few inches and you will have problems and the 19" wheels and tires are going to be worse.
 

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Long island roads are pretty well cared for. The biggest fear there is an idiot trying to make the light. just remember to not spin the wheels and you will be ok.
 

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I've been driving my Mustangs every winter since 2010. With four winter tires I've never needed any extra weight in the trunk. I've been in some pretty hairy situations, but managed without it.
Have you noticed any rust in your Mustangs? I just got a Mustang GT that was never driven during winter by the previous owner, and it is in such a good condition that I'm afraid of driving in snow and getting a lot of rust in 3, 4 years from now, even doing rust protection.
 

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Normally, I prefer not to have "junk in the trunk", but the weight can help, and as mentioned, if you or someone else gets into trouble, the sand can be used for traction
 

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Have you noticed any rust in your Mustangs? I just got a Mustang GT that was never driven during winter by the previous owner, and it is in such a good condition that I'm afraid of driving in snow and getting a lot of rust in 3, 4 years from now, even doing rust protection.
The axle housing and suspension components are rusty. But that is the case for all non-track pack Mustangs. Those components are usually rusty by the time they are installed. It is a Ford after all.

Rust isn't really an issue anymore with modern cars; the panels and sheet metal are galvanized.

That being said, I usually spray my cars down in the winter every few weeks.

You are much more likely to encounter hood seam bubbling than panel rusting, but that happens regardless of whether you drive in the winter.
 

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Normally, I prefer not to have "junk in the trunk", but the weight can help, and as mentioned, if you or someone else gets into trouble, the sand can be used for traction
Kitty litter works wonders too. I usually keep a small bucket in the trunk in the winter. Not for the weight, but for traction in case I really get stuck.

In winter though your biggest enemy is bottoming out.
 

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Kitty litter works wonders too. I usually keep a small bucket in the trunk in the winter. Not for the weight, but for traction in case I really get stuck.

In winter though your biggest enemy is bottoming out.
Good point, kitty litter works as well. I don't worry about bottoming out, in the winter, unless a nice day, my mustang is tucked away in the garage... thumbsup3.gif
 

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Good point, kitty litter works as well. I don't worry about bottoming out, in the winter, unless a nice day, my mustang is tucked away in the garage... thumbsup3.gif
Yeah that's probably the best policy anyway, regardless of the car. Luckily I walk to work. I always feel sorry for the poor souls trying to drive through 4 ft of snow and slush and ice.
 

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I put 3 80lb bags in my trunk but not all the time just when I know it's going to snow that day. My 5.0 with snows and sand has made it through 6" of snow. My limiting factor is ride height. I'm at 7" clearance in the winter.
 

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2005 4.0L V6, 5 spd manual.
Just snows on the rear.
Have driven 4 winters in southern CT AOK.

l
Snows also help with turning traction so its advisable to add to the front as well.
 

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I give you guys credit. To me, snow:car parked in garage
 

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I never put anything in my trunk during winter... it decreases breaking distance. Being able to stop shorter is more advantageous than being able to use sharper throttle inputs.
 

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I have a 45 mile each way commute and live in SE Michigan. I never put anything in the trunk for the winter and drive on the all season tires. Never been stuck or had any issues.

In addition to increasing the stopping distance with the extra weight, if you do have an accident what do you think happens to all that weight? If you slide off the road and into the ditch with a sudden stop the weight doesn't just sit there in the trunk. And if you have a coupe all that is separating your head from the moving weight is the fold down back of the seat. It's not going to stop 180 lbs that is continuing to move at 55 mph when you stop suddenly. You will go from 55 to 0 but the weight will keep coming until it meets something, like your head, to stop against.
 

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I think I am one of the old guys on this forum, and have lived in New England all my life, which means I've been driving RWD in the snow for a long time. I have never bothered putting extra weight in the trunk, for all the reasons that have already been mentioned.

That said, having some sand or kitty litter handy, in case you need it for traction, does sound like a pretty good idea.

IMHO, the most important thing is to have real snow tires on all 4 corners. Go with the narrowest ones that are in spec for your wheels, and a little extra sidewall height doesn't hurt.

Regarding the rust -- I drove my 2010 through two Massachusetts winters, with very very little rust resulting. I do have rust in the normal places like the differential and axle, but I think the mustangs in Arizona probably have that too. Whenever the temperature is above freezing, go to a self-serve car wash and hose it down, spending most of your time and attention on the bottom of the car. A drive-through no touch wash is better than nothing, but usually they don't have a very good undercarriage wash.
 
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