Ford Mustang Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
With some 2000 grit sandpaper and soapy water. I was lightly rubbing the sandpaper on the bumper and I finished so I wiped the water and everything off. I'm left with this dull spot on the bumper where there is no shine :nervous:nervous
I used Meguiar's Ultimate Compound to try to get rid of the dull spot and it doesn't work. I've attached some pictures FYI. I don't know a ton about paint and I was hoping that someone here would know what to do to get rid of the dull spot. I have a buffer, but it's a cheapo from Advanced Auto parts :dunce:. Please help!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,122 Posts
First Off did you use Wet SandPaper or just Sand Paper? Second how Bad were the Scratches, through the Clear and into the Paint or just in the Clear Coat?
I Detailed Hundreds of Cars, I use to have My Own Business, Wet Sanded and Buffed Many. I first off would'nt have used Wet Sandpaper unless I knew how Deep the Scratchers were. If the Scratches were into the Paint then Nothing would have got them out without going through the Clearcoat and getting into the Paint. Then the Clear is Gone and you will have a Hazy Mess.
By looking at the Pics Im afraid that's what may have happened to you. You have to be real careful wet sanding, you dont know how much clearcoat is over the paint so your running a fine line when it comes to knowing when to stop sanding and when you can keep going. I first off would'nt have used Wet Sandpaper or Sandpaper untill I tried some Fine Rubbing Compound and did it by hand, checked the results, waxed the spot then checked it again. If the scratches were a little rough I'd have started off with regular Rubbing Compound, did a little by hand, then buffed it with Fine Rubbing Compound, a Clearcoat Polish, then a Wax.
I guess what Im really trying to say is you have to know what your doing when it comes to Compounds, Wet Sanding and Polishing befor you start.
If I did'nt know how to start this I would have researched a how to do befor I started. There's a Good How To on the 3M web site, a 5 step process that could have helped you. Like I said I've done this to Hundreds of Cars and with all different finishes from Enamel to Clear Coatand each one has a different way of doing it. I've Buffed out Faded Enamel Paint Jobs that came out looking like New, and Scratches and Scuffs in Clearcoats that the people who owned them thought they needed a new Paint Job and when I was done they looked great and saved them Hundreds of Dollars.
I cant give you any help on your Stang unless I was actually there t see what it really looks like, it might be able to be fixed or mabey not buy simple Buffing and Waxing. If you did too much Damage and went through the Clearcoat and into the Paint then your gonna need mabey Paint and Re-Clearcoated. Once the Clearcoat is gone nothings gonna fix it to make it look good again.
I actually Hated Clearcoat when it first came out, back when it was just Enamel Paint and you had Scratches and it was'nt into the Metal you could Wet Sand and Buff it out, but when Clear Coat came out now you had 2 Coatings to deal with, the Clear and the Paint and the easy fix sometimes was'nt there when the Scratches were into the Paint, you then had to Re Paint and Clear Coat.
Always Practice if you Can on something befor you actually try it on something Nice to know where you stand. And know what your doing and knowledge about Paint and Clear Coat is a Must as is Knowing how to Wet Sand and Buff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
First Off did you use Wet SandPaper or just Sand Paper? Second how Bad were the Scratches, through the Clear and into the Paint or just in the Clear Coat?
I Detailed Hundreds of Cars, I use to have My Own Business, Wet Sanded and Buffed Many. I first off would'nt have used Wet Sandpaper unless I knew how Deep the Scratchers were. If the Scratches were into the Paint then Nothing would have got them out without going through the Clearcoat and getting into the Paint. Then the Clear is Gone and you will have a Hazy Mess.
By looking at the Pics Im afraid that's what may have happened to you. You have to be real careful wet sanding, you dont know how much clearcoat is over the paint so your running a fine line when it comes to knowing when to stop sanding and when you can keep going. I first off would'nt have used Wet Sandpaper or Sandpaper untill I tried some Fine Rubbing Compound and did it by hand, checked the results, waxed the spot then checked it again. If the scratches were a little rough I'd have started off with regular Rubbing Compound, did a little by hand, then buffed it with Fine Rubbing Compound, a Clearcoat Polish, then a Wax.
I guess what Im really trying to say is you have to know what your doing when it comes to Compounds, Wet Sanding and Polishing befor you start.
If I did'nt know how to start this I would have researched a how to do befor I started. There's a Good How To on the 3M web site, a 5 step process that could have helped you. Like I said I've done this to Hundreds of Cars and with all different finishes from Enamel to Clear Coatand each one has a different way of doing it. I've Buffed out Faded Enamel Paint Jobs that came out looking like New, and Scratches and Scuffs in Clearcoats that the people who owned them thought they needed a new Paint Job and when I was done they looked great and saved them Hundreds of Dollars.
I cant give you any help on your Stang unless I was actually there t see what it really looks like, it might be able to be fixed or mabey not buy simple Buffing and Waxing. If you did too much Damage and went through the Clearcoat and into the Paint then your gonna need mabey Paint and Re-Clearcoated. Once the Clearcoat is gone nothings gonna fix it to make it look good again.
I actually Hated Clearcoat when it first came out, back when it was just Enamel Paint and you had Scratches and it was'nt into the Metal you could Wet Sand and Buff it out, but when Clear Coat came out now you had 2 Coatings to deal with, the Clear and the Paint and the easy fix sometimes was'nt there when the Scratches were into the Paint, you then had to Re Paint and Clear Coat.
Always Practice if you Can on something befor you actually try it on something Nice to know where you stand. And know what your doing and knowledge about Paint and Clear Coat is a Must as is Knowing how to Wet Sand and Buff.
I used wet sandpaper and the scratches were just in the clearcoat. I've used a lot of different types of rubbing compound, and the scratches weren't affected by it. I know for a fact that I didn't go all the way through the clear coat and into the paint. I did a ton of research, which is why I'm so surprised/upset that this happened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Try switching to a finer sandpaper like 3000 and see if that helps but be careful the more you sand the more clear you are taking off and you deffinetly don't want to burn through cuz the only way ti fix that is a repaint
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Try switching to a finer sandpaper like 3000 and see if that helps but be careful the more you sand the more clear you are taking off and you deffinetly don't want to burn through cuz the only way ti fix that is a repaint

Telling him to continue sanding is the last thing he needs to be told right now.

OP what you need is a stronger "buffer" to get the scratches out. The cheapo autozone one isnt gonna cut it. What you need to do is go to a harbor Freight and pick up
7" Electronic Polisher
Use a 20% off coupon from a car magazine to help with the cost.
IF you have rubbing compound that will work. Set the speed on the buffer to 1200-1500 and hit the spot with 2-3 passes slowly. Repeat steps as needed. Whatever you do, do not wetsand one of these cars again unless you know exactly what the MIL of the paint is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Telling him to continue sanding is the last thing he needs to be told right now.
:laugh: hahaha, i would have to agree. i would have been at the body shop by now if i was him. or just ignore the scratch to begin with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Telling him to continue sanding is the last thing he needs to be told right now.

OP what you need is a stronger "buffer" to get the scratches out. The cheapo autozone one isnt gonna cut it. What you need to do is go to a harbor Freight and pick up
7" Electronic Polisher
Use a 20% off coupon from a car magazine to help with the cost.
IF you have rubbing compound that will work. Set the speed on the buffer to 1200-1500 and hit the spot with 2-3 passes slowly. Repeat steps as needed. Whatever you do, do not wetsand one of these cars again unless you know exactly what the MIL of the paint is.
Yeah, I definitely am not sanding anymore.... I'll buy the polisher. What do you think will be the best rubbing compound for it? Like I said, I have Meguiar's ultimate compound. Do you think that it will suffice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
The post of the guy with a Fox running water through his engine comes to mind....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
I've used the meguiar's and it sucks. I use either turtle wax or mothers. I lean more to mothers because they have a badass 3 step process. :bigthumbsup Just use a different kind of compound and you will be surprised how much that meguiar's sucks I know first hand I was scared when I used it the first time and it didn't polish out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,122 Posts
Just out of curiosity, what grit of sandpaper were you using to wet sand? And just to be clear, were you using specific sandpaper made for wet sanding, or just regular sand paper that you got wet? It was hard to understand what you meant when you said "wet sandpaper" in your previous comment. I'm not saying you should wet sand any more at this point, but if you used too course of sand paper when you first did it, it will make buffing more difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Just out of curiosity, what grit of sandpaper were you using to wet sand? And just to be clear, were you using specific sandpaper made for wet sanding, or just regular sand paper that you got wet? It was hard to understand what you meant when you said "wet sandpaper" in your previous comment. I'm not saying you should wet sand any more at this point, but if you used too course of sand paper when you first did it, it will make buffing more difficult.
I was using the 3M sandpaper that was meant to be used wet. It was the 2000 grit
It's called "Wetordry" sandpaper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,864 Posts
thats a tough one. even if you get it to polish out, and return a shine, i`m afraid your not gonna be happy with that spot. ive done some block sanding and polishing too. what you have done is you sanded the natural orange peel finish off that spot. so now you have a flat spot that will never match the rest of the bumper. a good detail guy might be able to fix that entire section/area on the bumper to make it look better.

i had a buddy that used to block/wet/sand/polish viper hoods from the factory. no orange peel on those hoods, when he was done they looked like a sheet of glass, flawless. but like #1ford said you really have to know what your doing esp on edges, body lines ect.

a good buffer, start with some white fine compound, PPG makes good stuff, then a polish( ive had ok results using meguirs polish with a variable orbit polisher to remove fine swirl marks) then i like carnuba paste wax. i`m really liking this collinite paste wax, its a blend of carnubas, you can get it online.( this wax is not cheap, around $35 a can)
 

Attachments

1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top