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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
R3dF1r3 said:
thump_rrr,
peeps don't seem to give props on a sw33t run anymore. That is a great time you did on a N/A motor. It is better than alot of guys who have a S/C, lol....I know you have discussed this before but, can you start another thread on your complete suspension mods and tell us how you feel they have helped you......:
Ok R3dF1r3 here it goes.

Sit back and enjoy the novel. Just remember you asked for it.

First I would like to say that I am not affiliated with Steeda in any way nor am I sponsored by them in anyway. I pay for all my parts with my hard earned money and I’m not shy to criticize them wherever needed. The complete list of parts used including part numbers is on my cardomain site. The link is in my signature.

Steeda has a bunch of interesting tech articles on their website Steeda . Since it is a site that uses flash you will need to click on the "news" link at the top of the page to get to the Tech. articles.

Urethane bushings will squeak like crazy if the proper grease is not used. Energy Suspensions has a grease with the consistency of glue which will never wash off Part No. 90.11104 It's the only grease I use.

The 05 is my first Mustang. I was born in the 60's and I am old enough to remember driving in my uncles' 68 notchback. Quite a few of my friends and neighbors own enough GT's and Cobras to start our own dealership. I nearly bought a white 88 GT with T-tops as my first new car but bought a Honda Crx-Si instead. That decision probably saved my life. Every car which I have ever owned has had only 2 doors and has had its suspension replaced. From my first CRX-Si to my Acura Legend Coupe back to my current Crx-Si winter beater.

As with all the cars I ever bought I never test drove the GT before I ordered it. I knew that the stock suspension wouldn't be up to my standards so the day I ordered the car I began ordering parts.

I came to the conclusion that Steeda was the right choice for me. They have won more class championships than anyone else and the feedback I received from other Steeda customers was positive.

The first mod was the swaybars with the rear end link kit. If you look at the stock rear Swaybar and end links you will find a set of end links the size of a drinking straw.

I picked up my car on a Thursday night and I must admit the ride was great compared to my bone jarring CRX-Si with autocross suspension but it understeered like a pig.

Front and Rear Swaybars

Saturday morning the Steeda swaybars were installed and the change was like night and day. It understeered much less than before and became a joy to drive. It still floated like a boat and looked like it was walking on its' tippy toes but it was a great improvement. The only negative comment is that in the rain the car is so neutral it is less forgiving for the non enthusiast and drop throttle oversteer on something such as a highway cloverleaf off ramp is possible.
Steeda has recently added 2 more holes to the front Swaybar to allow a little more or less over/under steer. The rear Swaybar now comes with steel end link caps making the billet caps an option. This is a good way for them to get another $90.00 out of your pockets.
I also added the Competition Adjustable End Link Kit to complete the front Swaybar setup. I have heard that people who use their cars for autocross have reportedly broken the factory end links but for street driving I would keep my money.

Chassis Stiffening

Once I replaced the Swaybars I felt a little more chassis stiffening wouldn't hurt. I ordered the Steeda Billet Strut Tower Brace for looks as much as for function. There is also a steel "economy" model for people who are less concerned about the way the brace looks. The G-Trac Brace which attaches between the front lower control arms keeps the flex down there to a minimum. Be sure to have a 12mm hex key or socket on hand or you will be running around trying to find one. I also installed the Steeda Rear Shock Tower Brace in the trunk for added rear stiffening. It stays low and out of the way which allows full use of all your trunk space. According to Steeda the ends of the brace should be welded to the rear shock towers for added rigidity. Mine is being held in place by the top mounts of the rear shocks for the time being. I will get it welded in when I do the Front Control Arm Relocation Kit (More on that later.)

Springs and Shocks

I won't spend much time on springs since everyone has their own opinion of how a car should sit. The Steeda Sport Spring drops the car approximately 1" all around. They're not too firm but feel just right. The front spring rates have been bumped up 30% while the rear ones have gone up only 10%. Although I haven't done it as of yet I will be trimming approximately 1" off of the rear bump stops. When traveling over repeating expansion joints such as on a long bridge the rear of the car begins to pogo at high speeds. This is due to the shocks weak rebounding characteristics. I have spoken to someone who has installed the 16 way adjustable Tokico D-Spec shocks in their 05 and has found a great improvement over the stock shocks. They are definitely on my Christmas wish list.

Rear Suspension

The rear suspension on the 05 consists of 2 lower control arms, a Panhard rod, a Panhard brace, and a third upper link.

When I dropped the rear suspension I replaced the Panhard brace with the stronger Steeda unit. I also installed the Steeda Adjustable Panhard Bar which allows the rear axle to be positioned properly. Because of the rear suspension being lowers the angle of the Panhard bar becomes more shallow requiring a shorter bar otherwise the rear axle moves ever so slightly to the left.
Since I go to the drag strip 2-3 times a week, once in a while I would get a little wheel hop so the first component to replace was the third upper link. The Steeda unit uses a urethane bushing in place of the factory hydra-bushing. It is also adjustable in length to allow changes in pinion angle and has a snubber for the front of the diff. From the moment I installed it I have never experienced another second of wheel hop.
I installed the Billet Lower Control Arms more for looks than anything else. I took the time to sand them down all the way to 2000 grit and polish them to a high luster. I have needed to replace the forward bushings in them already. Steeda sent a set of redesigned bushings free of charge in a matter of days. They were already aware of the problem. I can honestly say that I felt this mod did absolutely nothing for me in the performance department but when a real mustang fan notices them they really flip.

Front Suspension

The Mustang front suspension consists of a McPherson strut and coil spring, a lower control arm or A-arm, and a front sway bar and end link which we covered earlier.
Due to the front suspension design there are no adjustable camber and caster top plates available such as those which were available for the SN95 and Fox body.

The Steeda Camber kit consists of a couple of machined aluminum plates which accept hardened steel inserts. These inserts have offsets to give you anywhere from 0 to 3 degrees of negative camber in 0.5 degree increments. A set of 0.25 degree increment inserts are available by special order. The camber kit is placed on the lower end of the shock where it meets the hub carrier. The upper bolt hole on the shock is ovalized to allow the camber to be adjusted. I have mine set to 1.5 degrees of negative camber with
3/32 of toe-in for aggressive street driving. You will experience a little increased tire wear with this setup.
I still have not installed the Steeda Bumpsteer kit which is used to adjust the tie-rod angle on a lowered car to be parallel with the lower control arm. This kit reduces the cars' "steering" itself when a wheel hits a bump. I will be installing this kit at the same time I install the Control Arm Relocation Kit. This kit will raise the control arm location by 3/4 to lower your vehicles center of gravity and maintain the correct roll center. This kit requires re drilling of the K-Member and welding in some reinforcement tabs. It's a 6 hour job not to be performed by the faint of heart.

Wheels and Tires

The subject of wheels and tires is very subjective. I will not spend a lot of time on the subject other than to say this. The use of staggered tire sizes front and rear will tend to make the car under steer. To offset this either an adjustable sway bar and/or adjustment of front to rear tire pressure is required. The original 17" wheels and tires do not lend themselves to high performance driving although it is their high sidewall which contributes to the cars' excellent 60ft. times on the drag strip. I will be looking for an 18" setup with 9.5" wide rims all around such as the Steeda Ultra-Lite wheels.
 
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:winks Nice write up.

I bet your car handles like on rails. You should try to find somewhere to do a skidpad test.

I am afraid to ask, about how much are we talking for parts/ install?

I am interested in some of your Steeda mods. And yr right, the Steeda name stands on its' own merits.
I saw a show on the Eibach Pro springs, they have progressive rates for both worlds, soft normal ride and stiffen under hard corners. Thoughts?

Also, does anybody know if you can get 17" or 18" deep dish rims for the rears and not so deep for fronts with correct back spacing? After all, I may just want to go to aftermarket rims and only would if I can get a decent looking set that gives me a "drag" style look.

I think low profiles (lotsa road noise) are good if you are a cornering guy and tall sidewall tires (reduced cornering, softer ride) if you launch alot.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
R3dF1r3 said:
:winks Nice write up.
Thank you

R3dF1r3 said:
I bet your car handles like on rails. You should try to find somewhere to do a skidpad test.
It sure does handle like it's on rails. 2 of my friends have Nissan 350Z's and I can hold my own through the turns on my stock wheels even though they're running 18" rims with wide tires. Even though they don't say anything I know it must drive them crazy. We are going to be taking part in the BMW Advanced Driving School At Le Circuit Mont Tremblant next year. This is a former Formula 1 racetrack so the proof will be in the pudding.

R3dF1r3 said:
I am afraid to ask, about how much are we talking for parts/ install?
This is the first time I put pen to paper to calculate how much I spent on mods.

$2519.44USD + tax and shipping spent on suspension parts alone. :shocked:
$539.75USD + tax and shipping to spend on remaining parts to complete the suspension.

I do all my own labor so I don't count it but probably 20 hours total if I include the 6 hours it will take to do the Control Arm Relocation Kit.

R3dF1r3 said:
I saw a show on the Eibach Pro springs, they have progressive rates for both worlds, soft normal ride and stiffen under hard corners. Thoughts?
I personally don't like the feel of progressive rate springs because when you lean into a corner the feeling is not linear. The car begins to lean at a certain rate and then it begins to firm up. I don't think the average person would mind the feeling.

R3dF1r3 said:
Also, does anybody know if you can get 17" or 18" deep dish rims for the rears and not so deep for fronts with correct back spacing? After all, I may just want to go to aftermarket rims and only would if I can get a decent looking set that gives me a "drag" style look.
The ultimate drag wheel company has some beautiful forged wheels. Checkout the EVO forge-star and penta-star by Weld Racing. They come in sizes ranging from 17"- 20" in polished or chrome finish.
 
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thump_rrr, got a link for those? The forge star and penza star I have found will force me into a 20" and 20/ 19" rim.

I really am not sure I want to go 19" rims.

What is your rolling stock set up, still stock Bullitts and Pirellis? Lol, lotsa peeps dis the P-Zero Neros. I don't mind them, for stock but... there balding.

Keep me up to date on the BMW school test next year, sounds great.
 

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Good write up.


Couple of questions. When installing the rear panhard bar, did you center the rear or set it back to the factory stagger? And did you get the upper mount for the third link?

You should get the Spherical Upper Trailing Arm Bushing. Had a set in my Monte SS and completely changed the ride and handling in the back
 

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Discussion Starter #6
R3dF1r3 said:
thump_rrr, got a link for those? The forge star and penza star I have found will force me into a 20" and 20/ 19" rim.

I really am not sure I want to go 19" rims.

What is your rolling stock set up, still stock Bullitts and Pirellis? Lol, lotsa peeps dis the P-Zero Neros. I don't mind them, for stock but... there balding.

Keep me up to date on the BMW school test next year, sounds great.
Here's the link. Keep in mind these prices are for the chrome version. The polished version should be at least $100.00 cheaper per wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
redbullet said:
Good write up.


Couple of questions. When installing the rear panhard bar, did you center the rear or set it back to the factory stagger? And did you get the upper mount for the third link?

You should get the Spherical Upper Trailing Arm Bushing. Had a set in my Monte SS and completely changed the ride and handling in the back
Thanks,

No I didn't center the diff. I kept the factory stagger. This keeps the driveshaft in line.

I went with the urethane link to keep the NHV down. It's still my street car.
 
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