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I dropped my Mustang off at my dealer cause I was having the 1-2 hard shift issues and my clutch pedal stuck on a couple of high rpm shifts. Originally I was gonna drop it off on Thurs but the service manager said it would be better to bring it on Mon. I found no issues with that and agreed. I dropped it off [email protected] and got a rental from them cause he said it would prob take atleast a couple days with the transmission issues. I called on Tues at 1p and was told the service rep I was dealing with was at lunch. I get a call at 315p from him saying my car was ready to be picked up. I saw no issue and figured maybe they had to replace the clutch or something significant in order to have my car for about 16hrs and charge me for a rental for 2 days. I get there and I was told by the serv. manager "Your tranny is fine its normal for mustangs to shift like that. You had air in your clutch lines so we bled it." I'm a slightly miffed by the whole thing cause they seemed somewhat dismissive about the tranny issues and I see no reason to have a car for 2days to bleed a clutch. So what is a reasonable time to have a car to perform this? I would figure 1-2hrs for diagnosis and 1hr tops to actually bleed the clutch. Is that unreasonable? It prob wouldnt be an issue if I didnt have to pay for a rental car. But when I buy a brand new $30,000 vehicle I dont expect to have to pay for repairs or alternate transportation. I'm asking cause I got the customer satisfaction email from ford about my experience and didnt want to blast them unnecessarily. Thanks guys!!
 

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Yea, but the way it works is they just don't drop everything and go to work on your car. They are juggling the techs among the many cars they have in for service so sometimes what seems like a simple job takes longer because they really aren't working on your car yet.
 
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The factory hydraulic clutch system is self-bleeding, by pumping the clutch pedal(such as driving normally) you are bleeding the hydraulic system. I would get in writing exactly what procedures they performed and if they said they simply bleed the clutch, ask them how.

If they respond by using a pressure bleeder ask them to show you how it is hooked up(both with the vehicle on the ground and up on the lift). There is no bleeder fitting on the clutch hydraulic system.

FYI I wrote an install how-to for the Joe Heck Racing stainless steel braided clutch line so I am familiar with the clutch system.


Yea, but the way it works is they just don't drop everything and go to work on your car. They are juggling the techs among the many cars they have in for service so sometimes what seems like a simple job takes longer because they really aren't working on your car yet.
Not to mention they would have to replicate the customer concern before any major diagnosis and repairs are performed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The factory hydraulic clutch system is self-bleeding, by pumping the clutch pedal(such as driving normally) you are bleeding the hydraulic system. I would get in writing exactly what procedures they performed and if they said they simply bleed the clutch, ask them how.

If they respond by using a pressure bleeder ask them to show you how it is hooked up(both with the vehicle on the ground and up on the lift). There is no bleeder fitting on the clutch hydraulic system.

FYI I wrote an install how-to for the Joe Heck Racing stainless steel braided clutch line so I am familiar with the clutch system.




Not to mention they would have to replicate the customer concern before any major diagnosis and repairs are performed.

I didn't know it was a self bleeding clutch. I completely understand that i'm not their only customer and wouldn't expect to be treated as such. I would also be a little more understanding if I had dropped it off last minute or without calling ahead of time. I had set an appt online on weds and then at the appt time on thurs went to the dealership and was asked to bring it back on mon. which I was perfectly fine with. But being realistic I could understand them having it for that day to diagnose and fix it.
 

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I would slam them. You got jerked around. If they treat people like this a bad review is in order.
 

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To be honest...alot of techs have not personally torn into these MT82's. My whole lemon law fiasco (which is still going on btw...) spurred due to a lack of knowledge and negligence to learn the proper procedures for dismantling an MT82.

Apparently it has different bolts and needs special tools to open it up. They may have tried to open it to look, but gave up after they couldnt figure it out and just fed you a line saying they just bled your clutch line and that the tranny is normal.

I was fed the same BS about my tranny shifting issues and guess what...it ultimately got replaced because it was F'ed up and they knew it, but wouldnt admit it! Persistence will serve you well my friend...hang in there...
 

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So, what did they do...pump your clutch pedal for two days? LOL.

Self-bleeding clutch. If you are having high rpm stick issues, get a JHR clutch line as that will help.

Mike
 

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JAY WENTWORTH!!!! I Want My Car And I Want It Now!!!!
 

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The best way to bleed the clutch is by a vacuum bleeder.

Yes, pumping does work but vacuum bleeding is better.

In the process of modifying a master cylinder cap to do it properly.
 

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I agree with Grimace, ask for the bleeding procedure used, ask where in the service Manuel the procedure is described. There is no bleeder valve in the clutch hydraulics on 2011 and up mustangs.

OAC-Sparky: How can you vacuum bleed when there is no bleeder valve ?
And an honest comment here, not a disrespectful one: You vacuum bleed brakes at the caliper bleeder valve, why would you modify the master cylinder cap? A pressure bleeder is applied to the master cylinder not a vacuum bleeder, perhaps you are confusing the two.
I still agree with Grimmace there is no way to bleed the clutch on these cars.
That dealer was not being honest .
 
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I agree with Grimace, ask for the bleeding procedure used, ask where in the service Manuel the procedure is described. There is no bleeder valve in the clutch hydraulics on 2011 and up mustangs.

OAC-Sparky: How can you vacuum bleed when there is no bleeder valve ? You vacuum bleed brakes at the caliper bleeder valve, why would you modify the master cylinder cap? A pressure bleeder is applied to the master cylinder not a vacuum bleeder, perhaps you are confusing the two, however I don't know how either can work without a bleeder valve. That dealer was not being honest .
You can bleed the brakes/clutch via the reservoir the same way you bleed a cooling system after a flush. When you apply a vacuum to the reservoir, trapped air gets sucked out the system(albeit slowly) and is actually the most thorough method for removing air. Because there are no collapsible rubber hoses and because the system is sealed on both ends, there is no flow of fluid during the process. What happens when a vacuum is applied is the air gets dissolved in the fluid then evaporates at the top of the reservoir. The same principle applies to the A/C system during a evac/recharge except the Freon is a gas at normal room temperature and pressure.
 

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I agree with Grimace, ask for the bleeding procedure used, ask where in the service Manuel the procedure is described. There is no bleeder valve in the clutch hydraulics on 2011 and up mustangs.

OAC-Sparky: How can you vacuum bleed when there is no bleeder valve ? You vacuum bleed brakes at the caliper bleeder valve, why would you modify the master cylinder cap? A pressure bleeder is applied to the master cylinder not a vacuum bleeder, perhaps you are confusing the two, however I don't know how either can work without a bleeder valve. That dealer was not being honest .
No, I'm not confusing the two. It's how we fill the brake (and clutch and A/C) systems in the plant. You apply the vacuum to the reservoir cap drawing air out, when you release the vacuum the oil backfills it. In the plant we evacuate the system we are filling, the machine goes on the reservoir and evacuates the system, the vacuum is held and a valve opens and the fluid rushes in.

Edit: I guess Grimace was posting when I started writing this.

Anyways the PDF attached is the proper shop manual method to bleed the clutch.

Edit #2: Instead of a stopper in the kit I'm attaching a fitting to an extra master cylinder cap to attach to the vacuum pump I have for vacuum bleeding brakes.
 

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OP,

Just out of curiosity, before proceeding to draw/quarter and then light the dealer on fire, are you still having the high RPM shift issues? Did the bleeding of the system make any kind of difference for you?

If, not, then proceed on the current course. :bigthumbsup
 

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I would NOT think of bleeding the clutch as a normal wear issue (one reason why it would not be wtty covered) it should only need to be bled if it was leaking or had been messed with JHR line or something like that. Are they charging you for the bleeding or just the rental?
 

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Thanks, OAC_sparky (and grimmace), I stand corrected! and to the OP it appears that the dealer could have bled the clutch as per the service Manuel.
 

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UNGELDEDPONY

wondering what is the build date on your car.. hint is is in the drivers side door jamb.

beers
 

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Thanks, OAC_sparky (and grimmace), I stand corrected!
No problem. We have all sorts of "little tricks" when assembling vehicles that would surprise you.

For 99.5% of you, the first time you crack open a bleeder screw on your brake calipers (assuming you do your brakes yourselves), it will be the first time that bleeder has been turned since it rolled off the assembly line at the brake caliper factory. We don't bleed them on the assembly line, the system is filled like I described above.
 

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Putting system under vacuum doesn't actually suck air out. In reality you lowering pressure to change boiling point to pull vapor out. Just like pressure cap on cooling system raises boiling point. Anti-freeze doesn't raise boiling point pressure cap does
 
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Putting system under vacuum doesn't actually suck air out. In reality you lowering pressure to change boiling point to pull vapor out. Just like pressure cap on cooling system raises boiling point. Anti-freeze doesn't raise boiling point pressure cap does
True, however the end result is that air previously in the system is gone after a vacuum bleed.

You can bleed the brakes/clutch via the reservoir the same way you bleed a cooling system after a flush. When you apply a vacuum to the reservoir, trapped air gets sucked out the system(albeit slowly) and is actually the most thorough method for removing air. Because there are no collapsible rubber hoses and because the system is sealed on both ends, there is no flow of fluid during the process. What happens when a vacuum is applied is the air gets dissolved in the fluid then evaporates at the top of the reservoir. The same principle applies to the A/C system during a evac/recharge except the Freon is a gas at normal room temperature and pressure.
 
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