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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm going to be heading to my first track event this weekend.

I have tried to research this information as best I can, but have gotten many conflicting answers.

In the case of tire pressure, should I be following the recommended door pressure on the car? Or should I be using some % of the max pressure for the tires? Or should I be using some static pressure value like 40 psi?

I will be road racing on the Palm Beach International raceway here in Florida, so I am looking for tire pressure related to that form of racing.

Thanks in advance!
 

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The door listing is for general vehicle use operation......the psi listed on the tire is the max psi the tire is designed for......the tire contact patch area is what you need to assess......no one unless they have the exact set-up, tire size, etc. can advise you on this.....trial & error.
 

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Depends on the tires you'll be using. From my experience, I used to run Cooper RS3, High Performance tires. Normal psi is 35, for track I ran around 32 cold. When I switched to Nitto NT01's, R compound tires, I ran around 31 back and 30 front, cold. I now run Toyo RR's and run 29 back 28 front, cold. It also depends on the tracks. The rule of thumb is to get the tire psi to its peak operating temperature and that varies depending on the tire brand. On the average I would say hot tire, 38 psi is norm. Later, when you get serious about road racing, you'll want to invest in a good pyrometer, so you can check tires temps. This along with tire psi's will give you the best feedback as to what the tires are doing and what adjustments need to be made, if any. In some cases all 4 tires may have different psi, depending on the track and what the tires are doing. But for now, look at trying to get a hot psi of around 38.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys, good info to know.

It will be my first time so I'm sure it won't be as much a factor, since I will probably be driving a bit slower and have an instructor. I will also get some input from the more experienced drivers while I'm there to learn a few things.

In case anyone is curious, I'm running a 2016 Mustang GT with a PP, which came with Pirelli PZeros. Rule of thumb I can head to the track with 38 psi and adjust accordingly. I also live in Florida, and the temp for that day is going to be about 60 degrees, for whatever that's worth noting.

Appreciate the feedback guys!
 

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With a pretty stock car, and with those tall sidewall tires, you'll want some pressure. When you come off after your first session, look at the sidewall and see if there's any evidence of the tire rolling over and running on the sidewall- if there is, add air.
 

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Start with 30 pounds front and rear. You will feel a bit of rollover but those tires will grip. That is what grip feels like. As you go faster the tires will heat up, stiffen up, and your car will push (under steer) until they do. The tire manufacturer recommendations for DOT tires are not a factor. Talk to your peers at the track and your instructor. Hope you get an instructor with some Mustang experience. That prepared Mustang is a beast. Look for every straight line you can find on the track and make the most out of it. Ie. Stop late into the corners (Bremb Brakes) and exit early. Above all have fun!
 

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take some chalk or a paint pen with you, draw a line from your tread to your sidewall so you can easily see where it wears off to.

If there's still paint or chalk on your tread, let some air out. If the paint is getting worn too close to the sidewall, add a little air.
 

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Too late to use for correcting pressures between sessions on your first event, but still of value to see now where you were making the tires operate. Look closely at your tires' shoulder regions for little triangles (or other little figures) molded into the rubber in a few places around the circumference. More or less, you want the scuffing to go midway across them (away from the tread). All the way across is insufficient pressure, not into them at all is too much pressure.


Norm
 
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