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I'm buying my 16-year-old son his first car and he wants a 1965 Mustang Convertible. He is very responsible and maintains a 4.00 GPA. How much should I expect to pay to buy him a nice looking and nice running (well maintained) 1965 mustang?

Any idea how much it will cost a year to insure and maintain this car?

Any words of advice you could offer me?
 

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well as with any old car it will require a different style of maintanance. If you were to get one that was as reliable as it was from the factory it wil cost a pretty penny. insurance should be pretty low. If i were you I would get him a nice economy gas saver and buy a mustang as a projct car for the 2 of you. :bigthumbsup
 

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well as with any old car it will require a different style of maintanance. If you were to get one that was as reliable as it was from the factory it wil cost a pretty penny. insurance should be pretty low. If i were you I would get him a nice economy gas saver and buy a mustang as a projct car for the 2 of you. :bigthumbsup
+1 I would do the same thing, plus if you get him a nice 65 as a DD more than likely that car will get keyed or door dinged at the HS or college parking lot.
 
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A nice '65 convertible is going to cost a very large sum on money. Most I have seen are upwards of $15-25,000. A frame-on restoration is going to be in the $30,000 range.

As a college student, I would be very weary of driving a nice classic like a '65 vert to school. High school and college students have no respect for someone else personal property. I am paranoid enough driving my $1,000 Notchback to school.

Think about the safety of a '65 vert. They aren't built like a modern car for crashes. It probably won't have power brakes let alone 4-wheel discs. Power steering? Reliability?
It just isn't there for a classic.

A newer Mustang would be a much better choice for something to drive everyday.
 

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you really want to rethink your stance on the importance of automobile safety...............which translates into your child and his passengers safety...starting in the 60's most car companies went kicking and screaming into mandated safety improvements. side marker lights,nonfireball gas tank and filler neck design, collapsable steering columns, rght hand mirrors, rear window defogers, disc brakes,crash bar beams for the doors, rollover windshield pillar strength, shoulder seat belts, collapsable unibody structure...the list goes on and on....until hes old enough and experienced enough you need to put him in a much later model mustang convertable. review what consumer guide and the national highway safty institue have to say about your potential choices and make an informed decison from there. get something with side airbags and traction control and insist he and his passengers are always always always buckled up.
 

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65 convertable

I say get it for him. He knows driving it every day might cause it to get a few door dings and scratches but what the heck . insurance will be low. And later on he can always get it painted if it needs it. Any kid with a 4.0 GPA deserves it. Heck it might even lead to some of his friends wanting a classic car too. Get it I say. Oh yea be sure to let him read my post.
 

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Pros and Cons:

Pros: Dad wants to drive it
Cons: Dad STILL wants to drive it..

Joking:kooky: Pretty much like everyone said, "SAFETY." Newer cars are safer. For being an old car, if something goes wrong with it such as carb issues, something electrical, etc. He would probably be better off knowing that the modern day cars are I guess you can say reliable from breaking down or having any of those issues. Having said that, you might be saving money with a newer Mustang on having to fix the issues unless you fix them yourself. With a newer Mustang, everything is updated such as EFI, brake disks, etc.

I guess another thing could be is, "How does he drive?" Is he a wreckless driver, a person who just likes to drive fast. It's understood he has a 4.0 GPA but I've seen people with GPA's like that and still can drive crazy. So having said that, buying a 65 Mustang convertible is expensive and maybe rethink on spending so much on a car if he's just going to go to college and personal use. Maybe you can buy him a newer Mustang for less than 6 and tell him if he keeps up the GPA and finishes college, then you might consider buying him a convertible Mustang.
 

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I have a 1963 Falcon convertible I bought for my daughter as a cruiser. It's a project car. I explained to her this car would be a "nice day" type car and we would get her a daily driver. The steering column is the one thing people bring up...it doesn't collapse. Well, careful education and disc brakes help to deterr any extreme measures. In other words "PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT YOU ARE DOING WHILE DRIVING!" There are SO MANY others that could heed this advise. Best of luck.:bigthumbsup
 

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Whatever your choice is I would consider not getting the V8. I think 65' was the first year they came out with the GT. NO 16 year old needs a V8. Go with something newer, old cars need aolt of TLC
 

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I say get it for him....I got the '68 I have now when I was 18 and it has made for a great 18 yrs of restoration and ALOT of fun ;) and although I was a bit of a lead foot when driving it (and I did get a few scratches and dings here and there) it has been a wonderful experience "growing up" with the car and getting more and more respect for it and all classic vehicles....

As long as he isn't a dangerous driver and will respect the car and the road I don't see one problem with a 16 yr old driving a 'vert mustang....and seeing as how he is only 16 and has a lifetime ahead of him getting it now will give him the opportunity to work on it and make it his own....

I do agree as well that getting him a nice gas sipping vehicle as a DD and the 'vert as a project is a great idea too....

It's really nice to see a young person of that age have enough love for mustangs that he would want one as his first car....so again I say get it for him....just my 2 cents....
 

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Insurance for these old cars can get pretty expensive. If it is used as a daily driver, insurance rates are different than if it is being used as a show car. Depending on how the car is registered, depending on which state, is is registered as a daily driver and the insurance must be purchased to support that registration or if a show car then does the insurance cover the cost of full replacement or Blue Book. I know when I had regular insurance for my 67, is was costing over $400 a year for full coverage and "value replacement". I was restricted on the use and the mileage driven by the insurance and registration of the car by the state. I went with a Show Car insurance company and it costs me half of the other insurance and better deducts but here again it can not be a daily driver but I don't have restricted mileage plus I had to prove that I had a daily driver and was insured thru another insurance company. A lot of things you have to take into account when buying a Classic Car. Still nice to know that other people are wanting to buy and restore these GREAT cars.
 

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My first car was a 67 GTO (this was in 1985). It changed my life. Now I want a classic for every day of the week. I got alot of speeding tickets, wrecked it twice being stupid, but learned a love of cars. Just think, if Dad had given me a 1980 Pontiac Pheonix, who knows what I'd be doing now. I'd have to agree that alot of horsepower in a first car IS dangerous. I may have wrecked it twice, but that is becuase God was watching out for me and not becuase I had any sense (I should not be here today).

Secondly, my Dad told me that he would match the money I saved to get my first car. I started working and saving at the age of thirteen and had half enough for a 400 cubic inch 360Hp 70K mile machine. It did not take me very long to learn what I had and to care for it (as much as a teenager could anyhow).

$30,000 willl buy a realiable as it comes 65/66 Mustang. Plus or minus depending on it's rarity and options. Don't expect a souped up model to be as reliable. With horse power comes a certain amount of fragility. Is that a word? I would think a fully rebuilt stock 289 (not a hipo) would be a good start for a responsible driver with highway gears in the back and at least carry the braggin' rights of a V8. Not "what you got under the hood?" "a six cylinder". No offense you I6 guys - I'm just thinking of when I was a kid and could say "A V8!"

Maintenance: any decent used car will carry a 500 to a 1000$ a year maintenance bill. Unless it gets wrecked. Finding someone to do body work on a classic (and do it right) can be troublesome.
 

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I'm buying my 16-year-old son his first car and he wants a 1965 Mustang Convertible. He is very responsible and maintains a 4.00 GPA. How much should I expect to pay to buy him a nice looking and nice running (well maintained) 1965 mustang?

Any idea how much it will cost a year to insure and maintain this car?

Any words of advice you could offer me?
By him a 2005 or slightly newer V6, coupe, well used, along with a Haynes manual, hand tools, jack stands and good advice. It has classic looks, is much easier to maintain, take-off parts are cheap, has better fuel economy and is a lot safer to drive. Find one cheap enough to pay cash for it, don't insure it for collision and theft and you'll save a ton on insurance as well as instill on him a sense of personal responsibility. You can use the money you save to budget for repairs and upgrades.

He's going to need a car for college and a classic Mustang convertible is a bad choice for that. It won't be garaged and thus will be a target of thieves. It has no crash test rating, can be broken into with a pocket knife and the top of the gas tank is the floor of the trunk.
 

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My first car when I was 16 was a "K" code coupe. I shudder now when I think of how I made it out alive. My sons first car was/is a 90 jeep Cherokee. Big, with lots of airbags. Doesn't get good mileage but lots of safety items. We just picked up a 65 coupe that we are working on and will be his next car. By then he will be more experienced behind the wheel and will of hopefully gotten the dumb mistakes (that all first time drivers will have) behind him.
Heck I still get a little nervous driving my 65's. As stated above they are seriously lacking when compared to today's cars as to safety (however much cooler).
Congrats' on the 4.0, something to be very proud of.
 

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05 Mustangs have a 5 star crash test rating.

My first car at 16 was a 66 Mustang 6 cyl. coupe. Had a 66 GT 2+2 at 21 and wrecked it. Of course back then muscle cars were cheap (early 70's) and I had several.

Hate to admit it, but I was pretty wild in my youth. Only you can judge if your son is mature enough to handle a classic. Many of us grew up with them and survived without killing or maiming anyone. Of course, back then there were no cell phone zombies on the road in big SUV's.

What are his thoughts on a newer one? Ultimately it's your call but if I had children I'd have more peace of mind with them in a newer and safer car for a daily driver. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I've had a 65 convertible since I was 17. Looking back with perspective, that was both a blessing and a curse. There were very real risks giving a 289 4spd to a kid, but my Dad trusted me. Did that stop me from acting 17? No. Thankfully, I made it out of my teens with only a minor wreck involving a skateboarder (that is another story) but I did drive a car that was unique, and that has its own rewards.

It is certain that the 65 will strand him at some point, but that is possible with any car. As far as having that car on campus, I agree that it will stand out like a beacon for the lower forms of life to come and mess with. I have recently returned to college (due to the economy) and I won't take the car to campus. But isn't that what insurance is for? After all, it is still just a car.

In my mind, if the car has a dual bowl Master Cylinder, and seat belts, it would be a great car to have, even with all of the cons.
 

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1. At least he doesn't want a rice burner.
2. We all need a V8. Those old sixes were really weak and disgusting. I was there. Had 'em all.
3. Hate to say it, but those cars were really unsafe. Look at that gorgeous '65 dashboard and think about eating it (and the steering wheel). People forget how crappy they rode and drove, too.
4. The fox mustangs are three times the car as the '65. The SN95s are five times. The new ones are on another planet. Had 'em all.
5. That being said, go drive a '65 and a '10 back to back and decide. V8s, of course.
Happy motoring.
 

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As far as horsepower in a 65 Mustang...Heck the new 6 cylinders today have more horsepower that the old stock V8's. Get him the car. Thats what he wants.
 

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As far as horsepower in a 65 Mustang...Heck the new 6 cylinders today have more horsepower that the old stock V8's. Get him the car. Thats what he wants.
yeah, but 6 cylinders today are also about a billion times safer (and generally more reliable) than an old car.

So I was the class valedictorian with a 4.0, and had straight A's all the way through junior high and high school. I'd just like to go on the record to say that 6 years of straight A's still did not keep me from getting 2 wreckless driving tickets in my 78 LTD II I restored :smartass: :gringreen:laughlitt:kooky:

Now believe it or not I actually drove that car all the way through high school AND all the way through college as my daily driver and it was a very reliable vehicle. Until the summer I graduated college when the motor finally gave up and requested a rebuild :)

I loved working on that car and really respected it (though the officer felt different on those two occassions). It taught me a lot about restoring and working on cars.

I don't consider a 65 convertible a hot rod; to me the 65's are grandpa cars, so I don't think that's so much an issue. But they can be some work to upkeep and this can be challenging if you aren't mechanically inclined.

Get him the car if you really are fine with it potentially getting boogered up. A 16 year old driver is an inexperienced driver and combine that with the way these cars handle and operate puts high liklihood of at least some sort of accident. I'd get it for him as a second car to enjoy, but it would be better in my own opinion if he had a more reliable, safer, 'buffer' vehicle as his daily driver, especially while only 16.

If he still has that 4.0 as a graduating senior, then I'd get him that car :smartass:
 

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I am in the same boat with you. I bought a 67 mustang for my daughter to drive to school. I have the same worries as all the other people have mentioned so I have taken a slightly different approach. I am building the 67 with as much safety consciousness as I can. I replaced the steering with a power rack and pinion, the car will have 3 point safety harnesses. it has power disk brakes. and an AOD. it has a 5.0 v-8 that is carbureted now but I may some day go back to fuel injected. I intend for her to drive this car back and forth to school. I expect it will be dinged and dented so my plan is to fix it up nice to begin with and have her take it to a few car shows when it is done to help her gain some appreciation for it. I am also building it from the ground up and she is helping so she is "buying into it" so to speak.

however I do not intend to let her drive this car as her first vehicle. I have a 93 jeep cherokee that used to be my sons until he blew the engine. My Dad and I are going to rebuild that engine this winter and that will be what she learns on. it also will be what she will drive in the winter and if she goes out of town. the mustang will be a daily driver for 3 seasons but limited to in town and going to shows with me. hopefully this will give her time to improve her driving skills.

having said all of that when I started driving my first vehicle was a 1970 short box pickup that my dad bought at a junk yard. pulled the 6 cylinder and put a 429 and a toploader fourspeed behind it. he gave it to me when I was 15. we rebuilt the engine and painted it. that thing was a beast. I drove it for 6 years as my only vehicle. no accidents and only one speeding ticket. it had the gas tank right behind the seat. no seat belts and no power steering or power brakes. to hear people talk none of us should have survived puberty. teach the kids to respect and appreciate the vehicle. teach them to drive with caution and look out for everyone else and say a lot of prayers. that's about all any of us can really do in the end anyway.
 
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