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I've replaced suspension parts, brake parts, the radiator, wiring, body work, etc. but never did engine work other than replacing the carburetor on top. My Holley 2300 2-barrel is leaking like a sieve and rather then rebuild it again I was considering replacing it and the intake manifold.

What’s involved in replacing the intake manifold? It appears the distributor needs to come out and that’s what’s got me wary of this job.
 

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Hi,

I assume you will be upgrading to a 4 barrel, right? You won't be sorry! It's really not that big of a deal. You will need a Hayne's manual (or find the bolt torque sequence online), new gaskets, NEW intake bolts, some gasket cleaner, "The Right Stuff" gasket maker, a torque wrench and several hours.

Turn the engine over a little at a time until the TDC mark on the balancer lines up with the pointer. If you take off the distributor cap, the rotor should now be pointing to the # 1 cylinder (approx 2 o'clock). After you've replaced the manifold, you'll want to reinstall the distributor to be in this same position.

Open the radiator cap and the petcock and drain the coolant.

Disconnect the fuel line, remove the carb/spacer/gaskets, heater hoses, manifold vacuum connections and temperature sensor from the intake manifold.

Remove the bolts holding the intake to the block. Work in reverse order of the tightening sequence, so you relieve pressure on the block/intake gradually.

Now lift the intake off. You may need to gently pry it loose if it's stuck.

Here's the hard part...you'll need to clean the surface of all old gasket material, etc. till it passes the white glove test. Use cleaner of your choice. Some people use brake cleaner...others use lacquer thinner or something else. Put some towels in the valley and stuff some in the ports to keep debris from getting into the engine. Vacuum it out when done.

Cut off the tops of four of the old intake bolts (or use pieces of threaded rod) and screw them a few turns into the corner holes. These will serve as a guide when you drop the new intake down. Don't skip this step! It's the best way to make sure it seats right the first time.

Once you're sure the mating surface is hospital-clean, put some rubber gloves on and smear a very thin layer of "The Right Stuff" (or RTV) around the coolant ports of the block and the new intake.

Install the new gaskets. Throw away the cork ones for the front and rear. Instead, use a thick bead of "The Right Stuff", with a little overlapping the new intake gaskets.

Using a helper, carefully lower the new intake onto the guide bolts. Remove the guide bolts and thread the new intake bolts into the holes. Thread sealant is a good idea here.

Torque the intake down, according to the recommended pattern and force. Don't do it all at once...tighten in three passes. Let it sit for a while and see if it needs to be tightened some more.

Once you're done, reconnect the heater hoses and temp sensor (use teflon tape on the threads) and refill the coolant. Check to make sure there are no obvious leaks.

Now reinstall the carb/spacer/gaskets, reconnect the fuel line, and manifold vacuum tree.

Reinstall the dizzy like you had it and begin tuning.

It's best to work from a manual, but this summary should give you an idea of what you're in for. I'm sure others will chime in on stuff I've forgotten ;)

Do this! It's not hard and you'll see big results. Good luck!
 

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I did it without pulling the distributor. You'll have to be a tad more careful, but instead of coming straight up, you'll have to move the intake backwards first, no huge issue. If I remember right, the distributor on Windsors has no connection to the intake manifold. Now, mine is a '65, but that should mean that there's more room in yours, so this swap should actually be easier.
 
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Copied from HERE: http://www.allfordmustangs.com/forums/mustang-ii-tech/120270-77-mustang-intake-manifold-swap.html

An intake manifold isn't that hard to do.

Here's what you'll need:

1. Repair manual for the car. (Can be a Ford service manual or a Haynes/Chilton type manual.)

2. A roll of paper towel (either the blue shop towels on a roll or thick white ones like Brawny, you don't want the cheap ones for this job!)

3. A 3/8" drive ratchet, a couple of extentions (3" and 6" should be good) a 3/8" drive metric and SAE socket set (everything from 6mm to 19mm and 1/4" to 3/4" if possible, some may have to be purchased in 1/4" drive and used with an adapter) you may also want a 3/8" drive flex joint. You may also want a set of wrenches and/or a good adjustable wrench.

4. A pry bar, you can get by with a really big flat-blade screwdriver, but having a good pry bar would be better.

5. A scraper. This doesn't have to be fancy, the cheap $0.50-2.00 kind that is little more than a handle and a razor blade under the counter at a lot of the chain parts stores works well.

6. A torque wrench, with the right sized socket for the intake manfold hold down bolts.

7. ALL of the parts: Intake gaskets, gasket sealant (Silicone RTV and Shellac), a thermostat and gasket (thermostat and gasket is $3-5, do it while you're in there), carburetor base gasket and EGR plate gasket (you might not need the EGR gasket, depends on application) fresh oil and filter (you WILL get coolant in your oil if this is your first time doing this, heck, even seasoned pros do sometimes! just change it when you're done, save yourself the potential headache!) two gallons of coolant, teflon tape or sealant, some chalk or tape to mark the distributor position if you have to pull it, and while you're at it a fuel filter (gonna have to disconnect the hose that goes to it anyway, might as well change it while you're in there too!) a can or two of carburetor cleaner... oh, and a pen and paper to take notes! Another helpful item is a shop vac.

Okay.... if you're still with me, here's how you do it.

1. disconnect the battery (call me crazy, but I do it for this job... sometimes I actually have to (my Mustang II's got a negative cable that runs to the intake, factory did it). Then drain the coolant.

2. Remove the air cleaner and take notes (where the pen and paper comes in) of where the various hoses, linkages, cables, and wires go.

3. Carefully disconnect said wires, linkages, cables, and hoses (some will be brittle, they could be decades old!) and set them aside.

4. Remove the four nuts or bolts holding down the carburetor and remove it, setting it in a safe place, being careful not to bend any of it's linkage.

5. Set the new manifold beside the old one. Remove the brackets and fittings from the old one and transfer them to the new one, don't tighten anything down on the new one yet though, you may need to move/remove some of these things to put in the hold-down bolts.

6. Disconnect the upper radiator hose and move it out of your way. There will probably be some coolant left in it, so watch for the inevitable splash at your feet.

7. Remove the thermostat housing and use the scraper to clean it's mating surfaces as well as the ones where it mounts on the new intake.

8. Start removing the intake manifold hold down bolts, noting where they go (you can stab them into a box in order if you'd like so that they don't get lost and are lined up for you when you need them again.

9. Once all the bolts are out, gently push the edge of the pry bar through the sealant at the front edge of the intake where it meets the block, if you can make any progress there, keep pushing, rocking the pry bar back and forth and/or up and down until it gets through there, once it's in, slowly pull back on the pry bar, the intake should "pop", once it does, any coolant left in the passages just went into your oil, but don't worry about that, that's why we're going to change it later!

10. Now that the intake manifold is loose, slowly pick it up (straight up if possible) and set it aside. Now is where the paper towels come in, stuff one in each of the intake ports and coolant passages on the heads (carefully, you want the paper towel to keep debris out, not push any in!) Then line the lifter valley (the part of the engine under the intake manifold) with paper towels.

11. Use your scraper to scrape every part of the gasket mating surfaces of the heads, the new intake, and the block clean, get all as clean as possible, they need to be almost perfect. You can use the carburetor cleaner to help soften up old gasket material.

12. carefully remove the paper towels from the ports and passages, so that any debris falls into the paper towels lining the lifter valley.

13. Carefully lift the paper towels out of the lifter valley so that no debris falls into the engine. If you have a shop vac, it's not a bad idea to use it to suck any possible debris from the intake ports and coolant passages (note, a good and powerful shop vac WILL suck up oil and/or coolant, so do it without the filter using only a wet/dry shop vac! If using the shop vac, wipe dry any surface that gets wet, spraying away any oil that gets on a mating surface with the carb cleaner)

14. Coat the mating surfaces of the heads with shellac-type gasket sealant, place the intake gaskets on there.

15. Your intake gasket kit probably came with cork pieces to place at the front and rear of the block, throw them away. Put a nice THICK bead of Silicone RTV there instead.

16. After everything has cured the recommended time (you did read the tube and bottle, right??? It's usually 15 minutes) VERY gently set the intake down, so as not to disturb the gaskets, and place one bolt in each of the four corners, but don't tighten them more than one or two turns, they're just going in to hold it all in place.

17. This is where the repair manual comes in... You need to turn to their instructions on how to do this, because they'll have the torque specs and the tightening sequence for you, Do as your manual instructs for this part.

18. Install the new Thermostat and gasket along with the water outlet, you can use either type of gasket sealer on this.

19. Install the carburetor using the new gasket and fuel filter. Look inside the carb, if it's black, spray some carburetor cleaner in there to clean it before installing.

20. Reinstall your various cables, wires, and hoses.

21. Change your oil and filter.

22. Fill the system with coolant and water (50/50 ratio unless you live where it gets really cold).

23. Reconnect the battery, start the engine and listen for vacuum leaks (loud hissing or whistling noises) look for obvious signs of coolant or oil leaks, let it run about 30 seconds to a minute total and shut it off, check the oil. If it's milky, than you've got coolant leaking into your oil and need to do it again... if it's still clean, you're good to go on to the next step.

24. Re-start the engine; as the engine warms up, add coolant till the system is topped-off and the thermostat has opened (coolant is flowing through the system quickly).

25. After you've got the cooling system filled up and the engine at operating temperature with no leaks, shut if off, check the oil one more time, if it's still clean, crank her up and take her for a test drive. If it's not still clean or there are leaks, let it cool off and start over.


DISCLAIMER: This is just a generic article on how to do an intake manifold on most OHV V6 and V8 engines. All steps may not be covered for all vehicles. Though I do work on cars for a living doesn't mean I know everything. I always recommend comparing my notes to those in an owner's or service manual, and where my opinions and theirs differ, follow theirs!
 

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ahhh okay good cause I just replaced my intake and polished off the old bolts and reused them haha

I supposed a new set from edelbrock or arp wouldve been nice tho the edelbrock ones come with hardened washers
 

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re-using bolts is tempting fate. Those things are torqued down pretty hard and are subjected to extremes in heat and vibration. I've snapped off the heads of bolts I've tried to re-use. Do yourself a favor. Spend the 10 bucks and buy new bolts. Unless you like fishing out snapped ones.
 

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general question

Hi - am following this and some other threads to upgrade my 1966 289 from a 2 to a 4 barrel Edelbrock 600 with the performer intake - this was very useful so thank you very much all for the detailed descriptions and advise!! have a more general question as I am totally new to working on engines (I am actually an accountant who have never done more than changing oil or spark plugs until recently). so I understand the intake transports the air and gas to the valves and down into the cylinders and also bridges the water lines from between the two cylinder banks. having had the intake off I see the valve shafts I guess. so, what is going on in the engine underneath the intake manifold? there should be no water right? I did also not see a lot of oil residues. am just wondering as I am nervous about the sealing of the front and rear bridges and wonder what would leak if I did not do a good job on them? thanks much!
 

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There are actually water passages through the intake as well as air, on a Windsor. In addition, there is a weirdly shaped hole in the middle on each side that allows exhaust to flow under the manifold, heating the plenum, which helps gasoline atomize (especially in cold weather) but hurts performance a little.

Directly under it is the lifter valley, which gets pelted with oil mist from the engine and lifters, but is generally 'dry'.

At the front and rear of the manifold where it meets the block, there are two cork gaskets. You kind of have to make a choice here: One is to forego the gaskets, throwing a thick bead of RTV on there, letting it get tacky, and then veeeeery carefully lowering the manifold on without smearing and smooshing the beads out of place. The second option is to use the cork gaskets with a little dab of RTV in the corners. It can be a real challenge to get them to stay where they're supposed to! Both methods work fine; there are pros and cons to each.

If the two manifold gaskets that run down the sides are in place correctly, then your water passages and intake runners will all be sealed up nicely, so no worries. The main thing to worry about is not letting them shift, falling downward as you put the manifold on. This generally causes air leaks, although it's also possible to leak water down into your oil pan through the lifter valley. Both will require you to take it all apart and do it again, but neither is the end of the world if it happens!

One more thing to really be careful of: Intake bolts need to be torqued down, but NOT TOO TIGHT. Just snug them up, check your gaskets, and then use a torque wrench to get them to their final setting. Even a 'wimp' can overtorque an intake bolt with a ratchet. When it happens, you hear a little "PING" as the bolt snaps in half, and then you get to go through the fun of figuring out how to remove a broken bolt from your engine. Also be very careful not to drop anything down into the intake as you are doing the work, as you will then probably discover the fun of pulling your heads to get it out.

Happy wrenching!
 

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Thanks a lot, this relaxes me quite a bit!! I've been very careful with the two manifold gaskets and actually had four "guiding" old manifold screws I took the heads off and put them on the block so when I put the new manifold on, it "fell" in place perfectly with no need to move around to avoid exactly what you mentioned. I torqued them down in about 10 rounds following the sequence in the Edelbrock manual. I did let everything cure overnight now and this evening go over them with the torque wrench one more time and then continue the build with the carb. this is really exciting!!
 

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Intake manifold studs (double-ended threads with nuts to hold it on instead of bolts) make the job a LOT easier!

You also get more accurate torque readings because you're not twisting the whole bolt, just the nut on top.
 

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Good point - unfortunately neither Ford nor Edelbrock seem to think about us too much in that regards. Next time I'll just find some longer threads :grin:
 

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Hi - need some more help please as I am struggling to find the right spots for the stock heater hose fitting and the temp sending unit. I have a stock replacement heater hose fitting that goes right in front of the thermostat housing into the stock intake, but the opening on the Edelbrock Performer intake is much larger? do I have to get a special replacement from edelbrock or should it be moved to the back of the Edelbrock performer (it seems to fit there)? similar the temp sending unit, sat on my stock intake on the driver side next to the distributor - when I try to screw it in, I hit some resistance after a few turns and got cautious - it seems though there is some thread sealant on it and that's maybe why but am a little cautious to apply force when not being too sure - should I just force it in or does it go somewhere else on the Edelbrock intake? thanks much!
 

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You can just buy an adapter to make it fit the intake from any auto shop. I believe it is around 5/8.
Leave the fittings where Ford intended them to be, there is a good reason why the fittings are where they are.

The Edelbrock intake should have similar locations for both the temp and heater locations.
Post a picture so we can see what you have.

"I hit some resistance after a few turns and got cautious"
That is because the fitting has a tapered thread, you don't need to screw them all the way in. A little thread tape will help with any leaks too but you must remove the old thread sealer first.
 
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