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Discussion Starter #1
I know it's been discussed before and I got some inspiration to do it to mine so I thought I'd share a few pics just so others can see how it turned out. I just used some touch up paint so if you get close the lettering isn't perfect but it looks good from 20 ft.

I got the inspiration from this die cast 69 GTO that I have on my desk at work. this is just an image off of google and it's hard to see the lettering on the tires but you get the idea:
http://www.diecastfast.com/mm5/graphics/00000001/dub_gto_o.jpg


Here's how it came out on my car:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Lantis_Liebley/Mustang/IMAG0142.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Lantis_Liebley/Mustang/IMAG0141.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Lantis_Liebley/Mustang/IMAG0144.jpg

and a closer up on the tire where you can see the low quality of my painting skills.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Lantis_Liebley/Mustang/IMAG0143.jpg
 

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Sorry not to my taste at all.:nono:

And what is that yellow sticker on your fender?

Of course your car but does not add anything to it for me.
 

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that looks really good. I have wanted RWL on my tires but have not been brave enough to try painting them. Plus, my tires are kumo and the letters would not look right.

:bigthumbsup
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sorry not to my taste at all.:nono:

And what is that yellow sticker on your fender?

Of course your car but does not add anything to it for me.
yeah it's definitely not for everyone. the biggest problem is getting the paint right and you have to lay it on thick or it just sinks into the grooves in the letters and looks weird. (this is why I just did it with what I had on hand and didn't invest any money into it because I wasn't sure I would like it and wanted to be able to take the paint back off if needed).

yellow sticker is actually a Terlingua logo. The car isn't badged as a shelby or anything like that. And I have actually been asked why I had Porsche badges on my car because people didn't really look at them and just saw a yellow crest. I just thought the logo was cool and it's a cool bit of mustang history.

@NCWildhorse:
yeah I had to put the car on jack stands and roll the tires into the garage (so I could be in the shade) and then paint them with a little can of touch up paint but using a small detailing brush because the ones that come with the touch up paints flex too much and make a mess. It was definitely not easy going at first and I had a little tool that's like an exacto knife on one end and a curved scraper on the other to clean up the edges and bits where I oopsed and got paint outside the lines.
as far as them being Kumho's, you could always use a different brand name. Like paint them to look like full on race slicks and have people like "wtf? I ain't racing him, he's on slicks".
 

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@NCWildhorse:
as far as them being Kumho's, you could always use a different brand name. Like paint them to look like full on race slicks and have people like "wtf? I ain't racing him, he's on slicks".
:heha::heha::heha::heha::heha:Now that was funny!
 

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I just used some touch up paint so if you get close the lettering isn't perfect but it looks good from 20 ft.
Take a pic from 200 ft. You will find it looks even better. (just messing with ya...:bigthumbsup... in a playful mood and off from work today).

Must be near impossible to get the brush strokes even. I would mask the letter edges and spray. Although that would be a huge pain in the behind to do.
 

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When I bought my current car 6 years ago, the previous owner had installed BF Goodrich Radial T/As on it, and they had raised white letters. It looked pretty good on my white car with the particular rims it had. That look doesn't work on all cars, but I think it look good on yours. I liked the look of it on mine.

I had got new tires that didn't have raised white letters, and I bought some white tire paint to paint on the white letters. I took my time to paint them on really neat and everything. Looked great, but then I washed the car a week or 2 later and the paint came off. It looked good while it lasted. I would be curious to know if yours will stay after you wash the car.
 

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I like the way it looks. I wonder how it would look if someone were to put something other than what the tire says on there.. makes me curious.
 

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I like the colored letters look, but ...

My experience with painting tire lettering goes back to 1967 when I used body-color-matching paint to fill in the "DUNLOP"on the Formula One racing tires (left-over fronts from the Mexican Grand Prix) I used when time-trialing my Sunflower Yellow 1971 Chevrolet Vega Kammback. Yes I did. They looked really good for about one and a half heat cycles, when the rubber in the sidewalls percolated through the paint and turned them kind of a beige brown.

I did similar with the GoodYear on racing tires for my MGB roadster. Same outcome.

Trouble is, the way tires are built, the rubber is supposed to "weep", the chemicals come out through the surface and carry away everything I've ever tried, including all the "special"paints and crayons. Look at the back side of your new tires after they've been in use and not cleaned for a few months. That brown stuff is the boil-off, and it is inevitable.

It may be worth it for a one-time show appearance, but it isn't going to last on a street-driven car.

The way raised white letters work is: the tire is made with a whitewall buried under the surface black. Voids in the shape of letters are cast into the white band, and the black surface is ground off, exposing the shaped white rubber. That's all well and good, but whitewalls add weight and heat in operation, and are not really ideal for a high-performance car.

About the yellow sticker: that is the emblem of the Terlingua Racing Team, one of the most revered of all motorsports entities. Founded by Carroll Shelby and his friends, it was part of the legend of Shelby's early career as a manufacturer of superior racing vehicles. The emblem was designed by motorsports artist Bill Neale, and depicts a West Texas Jackrabbit (Lepus Terlinguicus) called "Lucifer", denizen of the Big Bend region holding up his paw to tell the cook, "That's enough pepper in the chili"; three feathers representing the three tribes in the area speaking three languages (tres lenguas) and the sun, which dominates all out there. The "1860" was included because that was the first year of racing in Terlingua (ore wagons).

Team Shelby members have a yearly reunion out there, last week of September or so. Worth a look, believe me.

PS: I have a small version of the TRT emblem on both sides of each of my cars:
 

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I love that white letter look on tires. Ive been in search for tires that come with that stock, found some but they were like 220 each.
 

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Pics of the white lettering on slicks on my car, taken by a professional photographer as car was launching off the transbrake. Notice the sidewall wrinkling. Tires have to be drilled into rim to avoid slippage.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I like the colored letters look, but ...

My experience with painting tire lettering goes back to 1967 when I used body-color-matching paint to fill in the "DUNLOP"on the Formula One racing tires (left-over fronts from the Mexican Grand Prix) I used when time-trialing my Sunflower Yellow 1971 Chevrolet Vega Kammback. Yes I did. They looked really good for about one and a half heat cycles, when the rubber in the sidewalls percolated through the paint and turned them kind of a beige brown.

I did similar with the GoodYear on racing tires for my MGB roadster. Same outcome.

Trouble is, the way tires are built, the rubber is supposed to "weep", the chemicals come out through the surface and carry away everything I've ever tried, including all the "special"paints and crayons. Look at the back side of your new tires after they've been in use and not cleaned for a few months. That brown stuff is the boil-off, and it is inevitable.

It may be worth it for a one-time show appearance, but it isn't going to last on a street-driven car.

The way raised white letters work is: the tire is made with a whitewall buried under the surface black. Voids in the shape of letters are cast into the white band, and the black surface is ground off, exposing the shaped white rubber. That's all well and good, but whitewalls add weight and heat in operation, and are not really ideal for a high-performance car.

About the yellow sticker: that is the emblem of the Terlingua Racing Team, one of the most revered of all motorsports entities. Founded by Carroll Shelby and his friends, it was part of the legend of Shelby's early career as a manufacturer of superior racing vehicles. The emblem was designed by motorsports artist Bill Neale, and depicts a West Texas Jackrabbit (Lepus Terlinguicus) called "Lucifer", denizen of the Big Bend region holding up his paw to tell the cook, "That's enough pepper in the chili"; three feathers representing the three tribes in the area speaking three languages (tres lenguas) and the sun, which dominates all out there. The "1860" was included because that was the first year of racing in Terlingua (ore wagons).

Team Shelby members have a yearly reunion out there, last week of September or so. Worth a look, believe me.

PS: I have a small version of the TRT emblem on both sides of each of my cars:

yep yep. we used to go out to big bend every year during thanksgiving/christmas time when I was little. We had a 82/83 Dodge Ram Club Cab with a full bed with bed cover. that thing looked like a tank, but trying to park it required a professional driver on closed course. beautiful country out there though.

@forensicsteve:
That's kind of the look I was going for except my sidewalls don't wrinkle.
 
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