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:?: Hello to all, I guess I am the new guy on your block, I came accross your site while surfing google looking for facts on lowering my stang, here is my question, I just purchased Maxspeed springs that I havent installed yet, I plan on ordering Steeda x2 ball joints, just put on black 18x9 fr-500s 245/40/18, do I need to get anything else like the offset STEERING RACK BUSHINGS, or CASTER/CAMBER PLATES, DIFFERENT STRUTS? I want to do this once and do it right, so I guess I just would like the facts from someone who knows the real deal, money is not a issue but I dont want to buy a bunch of stuff I dont need at the same time, any help would be awesome, Thanks!

Kevin
 

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I think the drop on those springs is 2 inch if I remember right and yes with that low of a drop you will need to do all of the things you listed to make it ride right.If it was only a 1.5 drop you would be fine without alot of the other things but a 2 inch drop is putting your suspension in a bind.
 

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I'm pretty sure the caster camber plates at a minimum are needed to make sure your alignment is right after the drop. The Ball joints are a nice addition and will make things work een better. As for bushings, I'm not sure at all.
 

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If all you're going to do is lower it 2", you will need the caster-chamber plates and new sway bar attaching hardware. I would recommend the ones from Maximum Motorsports. The other stuff is to fight bump steer and according to MM's install instructions that shouldn't be a problem.... but, it may show up. You really won't know if you need that stuff or not until you lower it and see if bump steer shows up.

Here's what MM has to say about it:

Bumpsteer is the toe setting of a wheel changing as the suspension moves up and down over bumps, or with body roll while cornering.

There is a myth that the tie rod should be kept parallel to the ground to avoid bumpsteer. THIS IS NOT TRUE! What IS required, is that the tie rod be kept parallel to the lower control arm so that as the suspension moves, the arc of the ball joint and the arc of the tie rod end do not cause any steering input to the spindle. As you lower your car, the tie rod end and the lower control arm move together, staying
parallel. If you install offset rack bushings on a stock geometry K-member, you are making the tie rod end
and the lower control arm NOT parallel. You will actually CREATE bumpsteer by installing offset rack bushings on a stock K-member.

Ford engineers have actually done a very good job at designing a low level of bumpsteer for daily driven cars. Specifically, Ford has designed the bumpsteer to toe out the front wheels under bump. This is a roll understeer condition; the outside loaded tire will turn to the outside of a corner as the body rolls. This condition is designed by Ford by positioning the tie rod end slightly low relative to the steering rack.

Increasing caster raises the tie rod end relative to the steering rack. Increasing caster up to half of the
adjustment range with our Caster/Camber Plates will actually HELP bumpsteer and help performance by
reducing roll understeer. If you increase caster beyond half of the adjustment range, the bumpsteer curve will shift toward toe IN under bump, or a roll-oversteer condition. In this case, it is beneficial to raise the rack, but only by about 1/10 of an inch. Offset rack bushings raise the rack far too much. The best solution is to lower the tie rod end using a bumpsteer kit (MMTR-3,-4). See our test results in the July 1993 issue of Super Ford for details.

Competition cars using stock K-member geometry will also benefit from an adjustable tie rod end kit (MMTR-3,- 4). These kits provide an assortment of spacers in .015" increments to best position a rod end at exactly the correct height; thus taking into account suspension geometry tolerances.

Offset rack bushings DO have a purpose and may be beneficial if you have raised your inner control arm pivots using an aftermarket K-member. In this case, raising the rack will help match the geometry of the raised inner control arm pivots. If you do use offset rack bushings, be sure to only use aluminum bushings - polyurethane offset bushings do not work. The urethane has too much “give”, and therefore it is impossible to get the rack mounting bolts tight enough to prevent the bushings from rotating during hard cornering.

From MM instructions.
 
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